MacBain's Dictionary - Section 3

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balt
a welt: See bolt.
bn
white, Irish, Old Irish bn; Indo-European root bha@-, shine; Greek @Gfans ( @G a long), bright; Sanskrit bhân, light; further away is English bale (bale-fire).
ban-, bana-
she-, female-; See bean.
banabachadh
worse for wear (M`D):
banachag
dairymaid:
banachdach
vaccination:
banair
sheep fold; See rather mainnir.
banais
a wedding, wedding feast, Irish bainfheis, wedding feast, Middle Irish banais, g. baindse; from ban+fisd?
banarach
dairymaidl from ban- and ireach.
++banbh
a pig, Irish banbh, Early Irish banb, Welsh banw, Breton banv, bano, *banvo-s. The word appears as Banba, a name for Ireland, and, in Scotland, as Banff. M`L. and D. gives the further meaning of "land unploughed for a year".
banc
a bank; from the English
bnchuir
squeamishness at sea (H.S.D., which derives it from bn and cuir).
bangadh
a binding, promise (Sh., H.S.D.), Irish bangadh. (H.S.D. suggests Latin pango, whence it may have come.
bangaid
a banquet, christening feastl from English banquet.
bann
a belt, band; from English band. It also means a "hinge". Dialectic spann.
bannag
a Christmas cake; from the Scottish bannock. See bonnach.
bannag
corn-fan; from Latin vannus, English fan.
bannal
a troop, gang, Irish banna; from English band. Cf. Early Irish ban-dl, assembly of ladies. Also pannail.
bansgal
(Dial. banasgal), a female, a hussy, Irish bansgal, Early Irish banscl, Old Irish banscala, servae; root of sgalag.
bantrach
a widow, Early Irish bantrebthach, landlady: ban+trebthach, farmer, from treb in treabh, aitreabh.
baobh
a wicked woman, witch, Irish badhbh, hoodie crow, a fairy, a scold, Early Irish badb, crow, demon, Badba, the Irish war-goddess, Welsh bod, kite, Gaulish Bodv-, Bodvo-gnatus, Welsh Bodnod; Norse böð, g. boðvar, war, Anglo-Saxon beadu, g. beadwe, *badwa- (Rhys.). In Stokes' Dict. the Sanskrit bdhate, oppress, Lithuanian bdas, famine, are alone given. Also baogh.
baodhaiste
ill usage from the weather:
baoghal
danger, so Irish, Old Irish baigul, baegul; cf. Lithuanian bai-me@?, fear, bai-gus, shy, Sanskrit bhayate, fear.
baoghan
a calf, anything jolly; from baoth.
baogram
a flighty emotion (Dialectic); founded on baogadh, a dialectic form of biog, q.v.
baoileag
blaeberry; cf. English bilberry, Danish böllebær.
baoireadh
foolish talk; founded on baothaire, fool, from baoth, q.v.
++baois
lust, so Irish, Early Irish baes, *baisso- (Stokes); compared by Bezzenberger to Greek @Gfaidrs, shining, and by Strachan to the root gheidh, desire, Lithuanian geidu, desire, Church Slavonic z@?ida, expetere, Goth. gaidw, a want. Possibly allied to Latin foedus, foul.
baois
madness, so Irish, Early Irish bis; from baoth (Zim. Z@+32 229) = bithas. Cf. sgth, sgos.
baoisg
shine forth: See boillsg.
baoiteag
a small wite maggot; See boiteag.
baol
nearness of doing anything (M`A.); baoghal? Cf. its use in Fern. MS.
baoth
foolish, so Irish, Old Irish bith, baeth; root bai, fear, as in baoghal; Cornish bad, Breton bad, stupidity, are not allied, nor is Goth. bauths, dumb, as some suggest. Hence baothair, fool.
bara
a barrow, Irish bara, Early Irish bara; from Middle English barowe, English barrow.
barail
opinion, Irish baramhuil, Middle Irish baramail: bar+samhail; for bar-, See birneachd, brth.
baraill
a barrel, Irish birille, Early Irish barille, Welsh baril; from Middle English barel, from Old French baril.
baraisd, barraisd
borage; Irish barraist; from the English borage.
baran
a baron; Irish barn, Welsh barwn; from the English
barant
surety, warrant, Irish, Middle Irish barnta, Welsh gwarant; from Middle English warant, now warrant. So St.
barbair
a barber, Irish bearrbir (Fol.), Welsh barfwr; from the English
barbarra
barbarous, Irish barbartha; from Latin barbarus, English barbarous.
bar-bhrigein
silver-weed (Arms.); also brisgean (from brisg):
barbrag
tangle tops, barberry; from English barberry. In Lewis, the former is called bragaire.
brc
a bark, boat, Irish brc, Early Irish barc, Welsh barg, Breton barc. These words are all ultimately from the Late Latin barca, whence throught French comes English bark.
brc
rush (as water), Irish brcaim, break out; cf. Middle Irish barc, multitude; Latin farcio, cram, frequens, numerous.
brd
a poet, Irish brd, Early Irish bard, Welsh bardd, Breton barz, Gaulish bardos, *bardo-s; Greek @Gfrzw ( @Gfrad-), speak (English phrase.
brd
dyke, inclosure, meadow, Irish brd, a guard, garrison; from English ward, enclosed pasture land (Liddell 35).
bargan
a bargain, Welsh bargen; from the English bargain.
brlag
a rag, tatter-demalion; cf. Irish barln, sheet, for braithln, q.v.
brluadh
a term in pipe music; from English bar + Gaelic luath.
brnaig
a summons; from the English warning.
barpa
barrow, cairn (H.S.D., a Skye word). Cape Wrath is Am Parph in Gaelic (An Carbh, Lewis); from Norse Hvarf, a turning, rounding, English wharf.
brr
top, Irish brr, Old Irish barr, Welsh, Cornish bar, Breton barr, *barso-; Norse barr, pine needles, Anglo-Saxon byrst, English bristle, burr; Latin fastiguim (for farstigium, top; Sanskrit bhr@.shti, a point. Hence barrachd, overplus. brrlach, refuse, flotsam (Wh.).
barra
a spike, bar, Irish brra, Welsh bar, nail, etc.; all from the English bar.
barra-gg
potato bloom, bud. See gucag. Also barr-guc.
brraisg
boasting, brag, brsaich, vain, prating; See birseag.
barramhaise
a cornice (A.M`D.); barr+maise. Also barr-maisich (verb), ornament (M`A.).
barrlait
a check (Carm.):
bas
palm of the hand, Irish, Old Irish bas, bass, boss, Breton boz, *bostâ; Greek @Ga@'gosts.
bs
death, Irish, Old Irish bs; Celtic root ba@-, ba, hit, slay, whence Gaulish Latin batuere (English battls, etc.); Anglo-Saxon beadu, war.
basaidh
a basin; from Scottish bassie, English basin.
bascaid
a basket, Irish basgaod, Welsh basged; from the English basket.
basdal
noise, gaiety; from Norse bastle, turmoil.
basdard
a bastard, so Irish and Middle Irish, Welsh basdardd; all from the English bastard.
basgaire
mourning, Irish bascarrach, lamentation, clapping with the hands, Middle Irish basgaire; bas+gaire, "palm-noise"; for baire, See goir. Also basraich.
basganta
melodious:
basg-luath
vermilion; from the obsolete adg. basg, red, Early Irish basc, and luath, ashes, q.v. Stokes cfs. basc to Latin bacca (for bat-ca), berry.
bat, bata
a stick, Irish bata; from Middle English batte, stick, now bat, which comes from Old French batte, from Gaulish Latin battuere, as under bs, q.v. The Breton baz seems borrowed from the French thought it may be native.
bta
a boat, Irish bd, Middle Irish bt, Welsh bâd; all from Anglo-Saxon bât, English boat, Norse, btr (Stokes). K. Meyer takes Irish and Gaelic from the Norse.
batail
a fight; See baiteal.
bth
drown, Irish bthaim, Old Irish bdud (inf.), Welsh boddi, Breton beuzi; Indo-European @ga@-dh, sink, Greek @Gbaqs, deep, @G-bdw, sink, Sanskrit ga@-has, the deep. Gl. fodio (Ern.).
bth
vain, foolish (Hend.); See b. Skye.
bthaich
a byre, Irish bothigh, Welsh beudy; b+tigh, "cow-house".
bathais
forehead, Irish baithis, pate, Early Irish baithes, crown of the forehead; *bat-esti-, from bat, Indo-European bha@-, shine, Greek @Gfsis, appearance, phase. See bn further. Latin facies, face, appearance, may be allied, though the latest authorities connect it with facio, make.
bathar
wares; from the English wares.
++beabhar
beaver, Irish beabhar (Lh.), Cornish befer, Breton bieuzr, Gaulish Bibrax; Latin fiber; English beaver, Anglo-Saxon bofor. Gaelic and Irish are doubtful.
beach
a bee, so Irish, Old Irish bech, Welsh begegyr, drone, *biko-s; a root bi- appears in English bee, Anglo-Saxon be (=*bija), German biene (=*bi-nja), Lithuanian bitis. Stokes makes the Celtic stem beko-s, but does not compare it with any other language.
beachd
opinion, notice, Irish beacht, certain, Early Irish becht, bechtaim, I certify; *bhig-to-; Latin figo (St. Z.C.P. 71).
beadaidh
impudent, fastidious, Irish badaidh, beadaidh, sweet-mouthed, scoffing; Early Irish bet, talking, shameless girl (Corm.): *beddo-, *bez-do-, root bet, @get, as in beul.
beadradh
fondling, caressing, beadarrach, pampered:
beag
little, Irish beag, Old Irish becc, Welsh bach, Cornish bechan, Breton bic'han, bian, *bezgo-; Latin vescus (=gvesgus)? Some have connected it with Greek @Gmikrs, Dor.Greek mikks, and Dr Cameron suggested Latin vix, scarcely.
beairt
engine, loom: See beart.
beairtean
shrouds, rigging; See beart.
bealach
a pass, Irish bealach, pass, road, Early Irish belach, cf. Sanskrit bla, gap, mouth; bilako-n (C.RR. 174). Cf. Welsh bwlch, pass, etc? See bile.
bealaidh
broom, Irish beally/i (Lh. Comp. Voc.); cf. Breton balan, Middle Breton balazn, Old French balain; also French balai, older balain, a broom. This might be referred to the common root bhel, bloom (prolific as a root, like the corresponding root of broom, as in Welsh balannu, to bud), but the Welsh for "broom" is banadl, Cornish banathel, which Middle Ernault has compared with Latin genista, broom (root gen, beget?). Jub. gives Breton as banadlon (R.C.@+18 106). The Breton might be a metathesis of Welsh banadl (cf. Breton alan v. anail). It is possible that Gaelic is borrowed from the Pictish; the word does not appear in the Irish Dictionaries, save in Lh.'s Celt. part, which perhaps proves nothing.
bealbhan-ruadh
a species of hawk ( Sh., O'R.); for bealbhan, cf.
++bealbhach
a bit, from beul, mouth?
bealtuinn
May-day, Irish balteine, Early Irish beltene, belltaine, *belo-te(p)niâ (Stokes), "bright-fire", where belo- is allied to English bale ("bale-fire"), Anglo-Saxon bael, Lithuanian baltas, white. The Gaulish god-names Belenos and Belisama are also hence, and Shakespeare's Cym-beline. Two needfires were lighted on Beltane among the Gael, between which they drove their cattle for purification and luck; hence the proverb: "Eadar d theine Bhealltuinn" - Between two Beltane fires.
bean
wife, so Irish ben, Welsh bun, benyw, Cornish benen, sponsa, Celtic bena@^, g. bnâs, pl.n. bnâs; Greek gunc/, B@oeot. Greek ban; Gothic ginô, English queen, Scottish queyn; Sanskrit gnâ.
bean
touch, Irish beanaim, beat, touch, appertain to, Old Irish benim, pulso, ferio, Breton bena, to cut, Middle Breton benaff, hit; *bina, root bin, bi (Old Irish ro bi, percussit, bithe, perculsus), from Indo-European bhi, bhei, hit; Church Slavonic bija, biti, strike; Old High German bîhal, axe; Greek @Gfitrs, log. Further is root bheid, split, English bite. Usually bean has been referred to Indo-European @ghen, @ghon, hit, slay; Greek @Gfen-, slay, @Gepefnon, slew, @Gfnos, slaughter, @Gqenw, strike; Sanskrit han, hit; but @gh = Gaelic b is doubtful.
beann
top, horn, peak, Irish beann, Old Irish benn, pinna, Welsh ban, height, peak, Middle Breton ban, also benny, horn, pipe (music), Gaulish canto-bennicus mons, "white peak" mount; proto-Gaelic bennâ; root @gen-, @gn-, as in English knoll, Scottish knowe. In Scotch Gaelic, the oblique form beinn has usurped the place of beann, save in the gen.pl.
beannachd
blessing, so Irish, Old Irish bendacht, Welsh bendithl from Latin bendictio, whence English benediction.
beannag
a skirt, corner, coif, Irish beanng; from beann.
beantag
a corn-fan; See bannag.
bearach
dog-fish (M`A.); Old Irish berach, verutus, from bior; cf. English "picked or horned dogfish"; "bone-dog".
bearachd
judgement ( Sh., O'R.); root bera, brâ, as in brth, q.v.
bearbhain
vervain; from English vervain, Latin verbena.
bearn
a breach, cleft, Irish bearna, Early Irish berna; Indo-European bher, cut, bore; Latin forare, bore; Greek @Gfros, a plough, @Gfarw, split; Armenian beran, mouth; Church Slavonic bar, clip; English bore. Also bern, fen in Early Irish
berr
shear, Irish barraim, Old Irish berraim, Old Welsh byrr, short, Cornish ber, Breton berr, short, *berso-; Greek @Gfrsos, any piece cut off; root bhera, as in bearn.
bearraideach
flighty, nimble; from berr?
beart
a deed, Irish bert, load, action, Early Irish bert, bundle, birth; Greek @Gfrtos, burden; root, bher, in beir, q.v. Also beairt, engine, loom. It is used in many compounds in the sense of "gear", as in cais-bheart, foot-gear, shoes; ceann-bheart, head-gear, helmet, etc.
beartach
rich; from beart; Welsh berth, rich, berthedd, riches.
beatha
life, so Irish Old Irish bethu, g. bethad, Celtic stem bitât-, divided into bi-tât; See bith (i.e. bi-tu-) for root. It is usual for philologists to represent the stem of beatha as bivotât, that is bi-vo-tât-, the bi-vo- part being the same as the stem bivo of be. While the root bi is common to both beatha and be, the former does not contain -vo-; it is the Old Irish nom. beothu (*bi-tûs) that has set philologists wrong. Hence Gaelic and Irish beathach, animal. Irish beathadhach, dial. of beathach.
beic
a curtesy; from Scottish beck, curtesy, a dialectic use of English beck, beckon. Hence beiceis, bobbing, etc. (M`A.).
beil
grind; a very common form of meil, q.v.
beil
is; See bheil.
beilbheag
corn-poppy; See mealbhag. Also bailbheag.
bileach
a muzzle, Irish beulmhach, a bridle, bit, -mhach for bach termination from bongim, beat; from beul.
billeach
blubber-lipped, bileach (H.S.D.); from beul. The first form suggests a stem bl-nac-. Cf. bilean, a prating mouth. Also milleach.
beilleag
outer coating of birch, rind; also milleag, q.v.
beince, being
(H.S.D.), a bench; from Scottish bink; English bench. Cf. Irish beinse, Welsh mainc, Breton menk.
beinn
hill, ben; oblique form of beann (f.n.), used as a fem.nom., for beann sounds masculine beside ceann, etc. See beann.
beinneal
binding of a sheaf of corn, bundle; from Scottish bindle, a cord of straw or other for binding, English bundle; from bind.
beir, bheir
catch, bring forth, Irish beirim, Old Irish berim, Welsh cymmeryd, to take, accept, Breton kemeret (=com-ber-); Indo-European bher, whence Latin fero, Greek frw, English bear, Sanskrit bharami.
beirm, bairm
(Hend.), barm, yeast; from Scottish barm (pronounced berm, English barm; Latin fermentum.
beisear
plate-rack on dresser (Rob.).
bist
a beast, Irish bast, pist, Old Irish bist, Welsh bwystfil; from Latin bestia (English beast). Also biast.
beith
birch, so Irish, Old Irish bethe, Welsh bedw, Breton bezuenn, Celtic betvâ, Latin betula, French boule.
beithir
a serpent, any wild beast, monster, a huge skate, Irish beithir, wild beast, bear, Early Irish beithir, Gaelic bethrach. In the sense of "bear", the word is, doubtless, borrowed; but there seems a genuine Celtic word betrix behind the other meanings, and the beithir or beithir bimneach is famed in myth. Cf. Latin be@-stia, for bet-tia? Norse bera, bear (fem.), beirfhall, bearskin, English bear (Zim. K.B.@+1 286).
beitir
neat, clean (M`F.):
be
living, Irish, Old Irish be, Welsh byw, Breton beu, *bivo-s; Latin vîvus, living, vîta; Greek @Gbotos, a living; English quick; Sanskrit jîv, living; Indo-European @gei-, @gi-, live. See also beatha, bith.
beir
beer, Irish ber; from Anglo-Saxon ber, Norse bjrr (English beer).
belach
ashes with hot embers (M`A.); from be + luathach, "live-ashes". Another belach, lively youth, hero, stands for be-lach; for -lach, See glach.
beuban
anything, mangled:
beuc
roar, Irish bic, Old Irish bccim, Welsh beichio, baich, *beikkiô; Cornish begy, Breton begiat, squeal, baeguel, bleat, *baikiô (Stokes). The difficulty of the vowels as between Gaelic and Welsh ( should give wy) suggests comparison with creuchd, Welsh craith, *crempt- (Strachan). Thus beuc, baich suggests benk-ko-, further gn@.k-ko-, root @gem, Latin gemo, etc. The same result can be derived from the root geng- of geum, q.v.
beud
mischief, hurt, Irish bad, Early Irish bt, *bento-n; allied to English bane.
beul
mouth, so Irish, Old Irish bl, *bet-lo-, Indo-European @get-, whence English quoth, Gothic qithan. The idea is the "speaker". Some connect Welsh gwefl (=vo-bel), but this is probably *vo-byl, byl, edge (Ernault).
beulaobh
front, Early Irish ar-blaib, Old Irish blib; dat.pl. of beul; also mixed with this is the Old Irish acc.pl. bulu.
beum
a stroke, cut, taunt, Irish and Old Irish bim, nom.pl. bmen, blow, from the root beng, bong, which appears in buain; cf. ceum from ceng-men, leum from leng-men. This agrees with Cornish bom, blow. Some suggest beid-men or beids-men, root bheid, English bite, which suits Gaelic best as to meaning. The favourite derivation has been *ben-s-men, root ben of bean.
beur, beurra, beurtha
sharp, pointed, clear; gibe, jeer (Hend.); cf. Irish barrtha, clipped, from berr; from berr-tio-s, with i regressive into berr, giving beirr.
beurla
English, language, Irish beurla, speech, language, especially English; Old Irish blre; bl+re, bl, mouth, and the abstract termination -re (as in luibhre, buidhre, etc.).
beus
conduct, habit, so Irish, Old Irish bs, Breton boaz, *beissu-, beid-tu-, root beid, Indo-European bheidh, Greek @Gpeiqw, persuade, Latin fides, English faith. Others derive it from bhend, bind, giving bhend-tu- as the oldest stem. Windisch suggests connection with Gothic bansts, barn, Sanskrit bhâsa, cowstall. The Breton oa seems against these derivations.
bha, bh
was, Irish do bhmar, we were (bh-), do bh, was, Middle Irish ro bi, was, Old Irish, bi, bi, bi, a perfect tense, *bove(t), for bebove; Sanskrit babhu@-va; Greek @Gpfu-ke; Indo-European bheu, to be, as in Latin fui, was (an aorist form), English be.
bhn, a bhn
down; by eclipsis for a(n) bh-fn, "into declivity", from fn, a declivity, Irish, Old Irish, fn, proclive, Welsh gwaen, a plain, planities montana, *vag-no-, root, vag, bow, etc., Latin vagor, wander, German wackeln, wobble. Irish has also fn, a wandering, which comes near the Latin sense. In Sutherlandshire, the adj. fn, prone, is still used.
bheil
is, Irish fuil, bh-fuil, Old Irish fail, fel, fil, root vel (val), wish, prevail, Latin volo, valeo, English will.
bho
from Irish , ua, Old Irish, , a, *ava; Latin au-fero, "away"-take; Church Slavonic u-; Sanskrit ava, from.
bhos, a bhos
on this side; from the eclipsed form a(n) bh-fos, "in station", in rest, Irish abhus, Old Irish i foss, here, Old Irish foss, remaining, staying, rest. See fois, rest, for root.
bhur, bhur n-
your, Irish bhar n-, Old Irish bar n-, far n-, *svaron (Stokes), *s-ves-ro-n. For sves-, See sibh. Cf. for form Gothic izvara, Latin nostrum (nos-tero-, where -tero- is a fuller comparitive form than Celtic -(e)ro-, -ro- of sves-ro-n, svaron).
bi, b
be Irish b, be thou, Old Irish bu, sum, b be thou, Old Welsh bit, sit, bwyf, sim, Middle Breton bezaff. Proto-Celtic bhv-ijô, for Old Irish bu, I am; Latin fio; English be; Indo-European root bheu, be. See bha. Stokes differs from other authorities in referring bu, b to Celtic beiô, root bei, bi, live, as in bith, beatha, Latin vivo, etc.
bi, bigh
doorpost, threshold (Hend.), Early Irish di b = two posts. M`A. has bgh, post, pillar.
biadh
food, so Irish, Old Irish, Old Irish biad, *bivoto-n, whence Welsh bywyd, vita, Cornish buit, cibus, Breton boed, food. bivoto-n is a derivative from bivo- of be, living, q.v.
bian
a hide, Irish, Early Irish ban, *beino-; root bhei-, as in English bite, Latin findo. For force, cf. Greek @Gdrma, skin, from der, split, English tear. Cf., for root, bean, hit.
biasgach
niggardly; from biast. In some parts biast is applied to a niggardly person. H.S.D. refers it to biadh+sgathach, catching at morsels.
biast
a beast, worthless person; See bist. The word biast, abuse, is a metaphoric use of biast.
biatach
a raven (Sh.); cf. biatach, biadhtach, a provider, farmer, from biadh.
biatas
betony, beet, Irish biatuis, Welsh betys; from Latin be@-tis, be@-ta, English beet. Also biotais.
biathainne
earth-worm, hook-bait, biathaidh (Dialectic); from biadh. Cf. Latin esca, bait, for ed-sca, ed=eat. The word biathadh in many places means "to entice".
biatsadh
provisions for a journey, viaticum; formed from biadh, with, possibly, a leaning on viaticum.
bicas
viscount (Arms.). Founded on the English, and badly spelt by Armstrong: either biceas or biocas.
bicein
a single grain (Arg.). From bioc, pioc? ( Wh.)
biceir
a wooden dish; from Scottish bicker, English beaker. Also bigeir, bigein.
bd
a very small portion, a nip, a chirp. In the sense of "small portion", the word is from the Scottish bite, bit, English bite, bit. In the sense of "chirp, a small sound", O'R. has an Irish word bd, "song of birds". See bog. Hence bdein, diminutive person or thing. Cf. Welsh bidan, of like force.
bideag
a bit, bittie; from Scottish bittock, dim. of English bit.
bideag
a fence (Stew.), bid (Sh.), Irish bd, bden (O'R.), Welsh bid, quickset hedge, bidan, a twig; *bid-do-, root bheid, split?
bidhis
a vice, screw, so Irish; from English vice.
bidse
a bitch; from the English.
bgh, bigh
pith of wood, gum. See bth.
bil, bile
edge, lip, Irish bil, mouth, Early Irish, bil, bile, Welsh byl, *bili-, bilio-. Root bhi, bhei, split; cf. Sanskrit bla, a hole, mouth of a vessel, etc.; vil, edge : Welsh also myl.
bileag, bile
a leaf, blade, Irish billeg, bileg, *biliâ, Indo-European root bhela, bhale, bhle@-, bhlo@-, as in blth; Latin folium; Greek @Gfllon, a leaf; further, English blade.
bilearach, bileanach
sea-grass, sweet-grass; from bile.
bileid
a billet; from the English
bilistear
a mean, sorry fellow, a glutton, Irish, Early Irish bille, mean, paltry. In the Heb. it means, "rancid butter" (H.S.D.).
binid
also minid (Arg.), cheese, rennet, bag that holds the rennet, stomach, Irish binid, Old Irish binit, rennet; *binenti-, "biter", root of bean? Cf. muinne, stomach.
binn
melodious, so Irish, Old Irish bind, *bendi, *bydi-; Old Breton bann (St.); Sanskrit bhandate, joyful, bhand, receive loud praise, bhandna, shouting (Stokes, who adds Latin fides, lyre). The idea may, however, be "high", root of beann, peak, binneach, high-headed. See binn also.
binn
sentence, verdict; *bendi-, *benni-; cf. Early Irish atboind, proclaims, *bonnô, I ban. Cf. Sanskrit bhan, speak, English ban. It is clear that Gaelic has an ablaut in e:o connected with the root bha, speak.
binndich
curdle; from binid, q.v.
binnein
pinnacle; from beann, q.v.
boball, poball
Bible, Irish biobla, Welsh bebil; from Latin biblia, English bible.
biod
pointed top; root in biodag, bidean.
biodag
a daggar, Irish bideg (O'R.), miodg, Welsh bidog, Old Breton bitat, resicaret, *biddo-, bid-do-, Celtic root bid, beid, Indo-European bhid, bheid, Latin findo, English bite, Sanskrit bhid, split. Hence English bodkin, possibly.
biog, bog
a start, Irish bodhg, Early Irish bedg, Old Irish du-bidcet, jaculantur, *bizgo-, root bis, @gis, root @gi- of be. Consider bogail, lively, quick.
bog, biog
chirp; onomatopetic; cf. Latin pipe, chirp, English pipe; also English cheep. Also bd, q.v.
bogarra
churlish; "cheepish", from bog, cheep.
biolagach
melodious (M`F.); from ++biol violin; from English viol, French viole, violin.
biolaire
water-cresses, Irish biolar, Early Irish biror, Welsh berwr, Cornish, Breton beler, *beruro-, Latin berula (Marcellus), French berle, So. berro. Possibly allied to the root of Celtic bervô, seethe, Old Irish tipra, well, Gaelic tobar, English burn. Cf. German brunnen kresse, water-cress, i.e. "well" cress. The dictionaries and old glossaries (Cormac, etc.) give bir, bior, as water or well.
biolar
dainty, spruce (Sh.); for bior-ar, from bior, "sharp"?
biolasgach
prattling, so Irish ( Lh. O'Br.); from bil, lip.
bionn
symmetrical (Carm.): Sc bien.
bior
stake, spit, Irish bior, Old Irish bir, Welsh bêr, Cornish, Breton ber, Celtic beru-; Latin veru; Greek @Gbares, trees (Hes.); Lithuanian gre@?, forest. Hence biorach, sharp.


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