MacBain's Dictionary - Section 6

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buil
effect, use, Irish boil, *bol, *bel: Pre-Celt. bhel, bhol; Greek @Go@'/felos, advantage, @Gw@'flw, help.
buileach
total, entirely; another form of baileach. Early Irish has bulid, blooming.
buileastair
a bullace or sloe ( M`D., Sh.); from Middle English bolaster = bullace-tree, from bolace, now bullace.
builionn
a loaf, Irish builn; from Old French boulange, ball-shaped loaf (?), which Diez suggests as the basis of French boulanger, baker.
buille
a blow, so Irish, Early Irish bulle, buille = bollia = bus-liâ + bhud-s-liâ; root bhud, beat, as in buail, q.v. Stokes gives the stem as *boldja, allied to Lithuanian bldz@?iu, belsti, give a blow, baldas, a beetle; German poltern.
buillsgean
centre, Irish boilscen, Middle Irish bolscn, middle, midriff = bolgn, from balg, bolg, belly.
buin
belong to, Irish beanaim. The Irish is from the verb bean, touch; the Gaelic, which has the idea of relationship or origin (Cha bhuin e dhomh: he is not related to me), seems to confuse bean and bun, stock.
buinne
a cataract, tide, Irish buinne, a spout, tap, Early Irish buinne, wave, rush of water: Gaelic buinneach, flux, diarrh@oea, so Irish; See boinne. Also puinne (Suth.) (W.Ross).
buinneag
a twig, sprout, Irish buinnen, Early Irish buinne: *bus-niâ; root bus, as in English bush, boosky, German busch, etc.
buinnig
winning; See buidhinn.
++buinnire
a footman, so Irish; from bonn, sole of the foot.
bir, birich
roar, bellow (as a bull), Irish bireadh, roaring; Early Irish braim; *bû-ro-, Indo-European root @gevo, @gû, cry; Greek @Gbow, shout; Lithuanian gauju, howl; Sanskrit gu, cry. Strachan gives as Gaelic stem bucro-, root buq as in Latin buccina, horn, Greek @Gbktcs, howling, Sanskrit bukka@-ras, lion's roar, Norwg. bura, to bellow, Shet. boorik, cow.
buirdeiseach
a free man, burgess, Irish buirgiseach; from the English burgess.
buirleadh
language of folly and ridicule; from the Romance burla, to jest, etc. See burraidh.
birseach
a deluge of rain; a rousing fire (Heb.):
buiseal
a bhshel, Irish buiseul; from English bushel.
bit
bashful (Badenoch): a form of bidich?
buitseach
a witch, so Irish; from English witch; "buidseach agus raitseach".
blas
pot hook; from the Scottish bools, a pot hook in two parts or "bools", Middle English bool, a pail handle, round part of a key, German bügel, arc: from Teutonic beugan, bend, English bow. Dialectic plas.
bumailear
bungler; from Scottish bummeler, from bummil, bungle, English bumble; of onomatopoetic origin (Murray). Cf. German bummler, a lounger.
bun
root, stock, bottom, Irish, Early Irish bun, Welsh bon, stem, trunk, Old Welsh boned; Armen. bun; N.Persian bun, Zend buna- (Bugge). Rhys has suggested a comnection with German bühne, a stage, boards. Anglo-Saxon bune, "stalk, reed", may be allied. It cannot be connected with bonn, for the stem there is bhuadh-no-, root bhudh. The ultimate root of bun, in any case, is simply bhu, bhû, grow, swell, Greek @Gfw, @Gfu@nlon,a tribe, English boil (n.), German bheule, a swelling, Sanskrit bhumis, earth; bhû, grow, is identical with bhu, be.
bunach
coarse tow, refuse of flax, so Irish; from bun.
bunait
foundation, Irish bunit: bun+it, q.v.
bungad
a hussy (Dial.); from Scottish bungy, pettish.
bunnlum
steadiness, bunntam, bunntamas, solidity, shrewdness; from bun, foundation. Cf. Irish buntomhas, well founded opinion: bun+ tomhas, q.v.
bunnsach
a twig, so Irish, Early Irish bunsach; See buinneag.
bunnsach
a sudden rush; from buinne.
bunntam
solidity; See bunnlum.
buntta
potato, Irish potta, fataidhe; from the English. It contains a piece of folk-etymologising in the syllable bun-, root.
buntuinn
belonging; See buin.
brach
turning up of the earth, digging; from the Scottish bourie, English burrow. The Scottish bourach, enclosure, cluster, knoll, heap, etc., is the English bower.
burgaid
a purge, , Purgatory; See purgaid, Purgadoir.
brlam
a flood, rush of water (Arg.); See brlum.
burmaid
wormwood; from the English Middle Irish in uormoint.
brn
water; from Scottish burn, water, spring-water, English bourne, burn, a stream, Teutonic brunnon-, a spring, Norse brunnr, well, German brunnen.
burrachdadh
raging:
burraidh
ablockhead, Irish brraidh; from Scottish burrio (1535), French bourrieau, Latin burræ, nonsense, English burlesque, etc.
burral
a howl, lamentation, so Irish; for the root, which is here short (*bur-ro-?), See bir. Cf. bururus, however.
burras
a caterpillar:
burr-
as in burr'caid, clumsy person, burr'ghlas, a torrent of rage, etc, seems from ++borr, great, excessive, q.v. burr'sgadh, a burst of passion, may be from English borasco, squall of wind.
brt
mockery; from Scottish bourd, Middle English bourd, jest, French bourde, a lie.
burrurus
infant lisping, warbling, purling; cf. English purr and purl (Skeat). Evidently onomatopoetic.
bus
a mouth, kiss, Irish, Middle Irish bus, *bussu-; Pre-Celt. @guss-; Teutonic kuss, German küssen, kiss, English kiss (Kluge). Bezzenberger cfs. Lit buczti, kiss; others give buc-sa, allied to Latin bucca, cheek.
busgadh
dressing; from the Scottish, English busk.
busgaid
a bustle (M`D.); formed from English busy; cf. Anglo-Saxon bysgy, business.
bustail
puffing, blowing (Heb.); from bus.
butadh
a push; See put.
butag
oar pin; See putag.
bth
a shop; from the English booth, Norse , shop, root bhu, be. See bothan.
buthainnich
thump, thrash, bang; from the root bhud, beat (English beat)? See buthuinn.
buthuinn
long straw for thatch; cf. sputhainn, straw not threshed, but seedless (Arg.), which seems from spoth.
butrais, butarrais
a mess:

C

c'
for co, cia, who, what, q.v.
c, ca
where, Irish c, how, where, who; a by-form to cia, c, q.v.
cab
a gap, indentation, mouth, Irish cab, mouth, head, gap, cabach, babbling, indented. The word is borrowed from two English words - gap and gab (Middle English gabben, chatter); Gaelic has also gab, directly from gab of the Scottish Hence cabach, gap-toothed.
cbag
a cheese; Scottish cabback, kebbock. The latter form (kebbock) is probably from a Gaelic ceapag, cepag, obsolete in Gaelic in the sense of "a cheese", but still used for the thick wooden wheel of wheel-barrows; it is from Gaelic ceap. Scottish cabback is a side form of kebbock, and it seems to have been re-borrowed into Gaelic as cbag. The real Gaelic word for "a cheese" is now mulachag.
cabaist
cabbage, Irish gabisde; from the English
cball
a cable, Irish cabla; from English cable, which, through French, comes from Latin capulum.
cabar
a rafter, caber, deer's horn, Irish cabar, Welsh ceibr, rafters, Old Breton cepriou, beams; from a Medieval Latin *caprio, a rafter, capro, caprones (which exists as a genuine 8th century word), French chevron, rafter. caprio is from caper, goat; Latin capreoli, goat-lets, was used for two beams meeting to support something, props, stays.
cabasdar, cabstar
a bit, curb, Welsh cebystr, Breton kabestr; from Latin capistrum, halter, "head-holder", from caput.
cabhag
hurry:
cabhlach
a fleet, Irish cobhlach, cabhlach, Early Irish coblach; *cob-lach; from kub, *qu@g, curve, root of Latin cymba, boat, Greek @Gkmbc, boat, cup, especially Latin cybaea, a transport (*kubaa.
cabhladh
ship's tackle, Irish cbhluighe; cf. cabhlach and English cable.
cbhruich
sowens, flummery, Irish cthbhruith; from cth and bruith, q.v.
cabhsair
causeway, Irish cabhsa; from English causey, causeway, from Old French caucie, from Latin calciata (via).
cabhsanta
dry, snug; from Scottish cosie, colsie, English cosy, whose origin is unknown.
cabhtair
an issue, drain in the body (M`D., who, as cautair, explains it as "an issue or cauter"); from English cauter.
cabhuil
a conical basket for catching fish; from Middle English cawell, a fish basket, still used in Cornwall, Anglo-Saxon cawl. Cf. Breton kavell, bow-net, Old Breton cauell, basket, cradle; from Latin cauuella, a vat, etc. (Loth, Ernault).
cblaid
turmoil, hindrance, trouble (Wh.): See cpraid.
cabon
capon (M`D.), Irish cabn; from English capon.
cac
excrement, so Irish, Early Irish cacc, Cornish caugh, Breton kac'k, *kakko-; Latin caco; Greek @Gkkkc; Sanskrit çka, g. çakns.
cch
the rest, others, Irish, Old Irish cch, quivis, Welsh pawb, all, Breton pep, *qqe; root qo@-, qo, qe of co and gach, q.v.
cachdan
vexation, Irish cacht, distress, prioner, Early Irish cachtaim, I capture, Welsh caeth, slave, confined: *kapto-, caught; Latin capio, captus; Gothic haban, English have.
cachliadh
( Arms.), cachaleith ( H.S.D.), a gate; co-cliath, "co-hurdle"; See cliath, cleath, hurdle, wattle. Also cachliag, (C.S.). It has also been explained as cadha-chliath, "hurdle-pass". Carmichael gives alternate cliath-na-cadha.
cadadh
tartan cloth, hose tartan, Manx cadee, cotton; English caddow (16th cent.), an Irish quilt or cloak; doubtless from English caddis, worsted, crewel work, etc., French cadis, woolen serge. See also catas.
cadal
sleep, Irish codladh, Old Irish cotlud, vb. contulim: *con-tul-, root tol; Church Slavonic toliti, appease, placare, Lithuanian tilas, quiet (Persson). The root tol, tel, appears in trth, gentle, Latin tolerare, Scottish thole.
cadan
cotton (Sh.); from English cotton. Properly codan, which is the usual dialect form. See cotan. For Irish cads, cotton, See catas.
cadha
a pass, narrow pass, entry; cf. Irish caoi, way, road, Early Irish ci, which Stokes, however, refers to the root ci as in Latin cio, move, Greek @Gkw, go, a derivation which does not suit the Gaelic phonetically. cae (Meyer).
cadhag
jackdaw, Irish cabhg, Middle Irish caog; *ca-g, the ca-er or crier of ca, caw; on onomatopoetic origin. Cf. English caw; also chough, from a West Teutonic kâwa-.
cadhag
a wedge (M`A. for Skye):
cadhan
wild goose, barnacle goose, so Irish; cf. English caw, for possibly the name is onomatopoetic. Corm. (B) cadan.
cadh-luibh
the cud-weed (Sh. gives cad-luibh, and O'Br.), Irish cadh-luibh; from Middle English code, a cud. M`A. omits the word; it is clearly Irish. The Gaelic is cnmh lus, which is its Latin name of gnaphalium in folk etymology.
cadhmus
a mould for casting bullets; from Scottish cawmys, calmes (16th century), caums, English calm, came.
cagailt
a hearth, Irish cagailt, raking of the fire (O'R.):
cagar
a whisper, Irish cogar, Middle Irish coccur; cechras, qui canet, cairche, sound; root kar, of Latin carmet, Greek @Gkc@nrux, herald (Stokes).
cagaran
darling: *con-car-; root car, dear, as in caraid.
caglachan
something ground to pulp or dust (M`D.):
cagnamh
chewing, Irish cognadh, Middle Irish cocnum, Old Irish cocnom: *con-cnmh; See cnmh.
caibe
a spade, turf cutter, Irish coibe, cuibe (O'R., Fol.), Welsh caib, Old Cornish cep.
caibeal
a chapel (M`D.); from Latin capella. The Gaelic really is seipeal, q.v.
caibheis
giggling, laughing:
caibideil, caibdeil
a chapter, Irish caibidil, Early Irish caiptel, Welsh cabidwl; from Latin capitulum, whence Old French chapitre, English chapter.
caidir
cherish, so Irish See caidreabh.
caidreabh
fellowship, affection, vicinity, so Irish, Middle Irish caidrebh, Celtiberian Contrebia: *con-treb-; See aitreabh, treabh.
caig
conversation, claque (Arg.); teaze (Perth):
caigeann
a couple (of animals), coupling: *con-ceann; from ceann, q.v.
caigeann
a winding pass through rocks and brushwood, a rough mountain pass (Dial. = cadha-iginn).
caigeann
scrimmage (M`D.):
cil
condition, vigour, appetite, anything (cileigin), Irish cil, Welsh cael, to have, get, enjoy, *kapli-, *kapelo-: root qap; Latin capio, English have.
cailbhe
a partition wall (of wattle or clay, etc.); from calbh, q.v.
cailc
chalk, Irish, Early Irish cailc, Welsh calch; from Latin calx, calcis, whence also English chalk.
caile
girl, wench, Irish caile, hussy, Early Irish caile; cf. Breton plac'h, girl; Greek @Gpallakc/, concubine, Latin pellex. Usually caileag, girl.
cileach
husks, Irish cithleach: cith-lach; s ee cth. From cth comes also cilean, a husk.
caileadair
philosopher, star-gazer; from the English calender, a mendicant dervish, from Persian qalander.
cailidear
snot, rheum ( M`F., cailidhir in Sh.). O'R. improves this into cailidar.
cailis
chalice, Irish cails; from Latin calix, cup, English chalice.
cailise
kails, ninepins (M`D.); from English kails, Middle English cailis, from keyle, a peg, German kegel, a cane, ninepin.
cailleach
old wife, nun, so Irish, Old Irish caillech, "veiled one"; from caille, veil, which is from the Latin pallium, cloak, English pall.
caillteanach
eunuch, so Irish; from caill, lose. See call.
cimein
a mote, Irish cim, a stain, blemish; from cm.
caimeineach
saving (Carm.):
caimhleachadh, caingleachadh
restraining (Carm.).
caimir
a fold:
caimleid
camlet; from the English
cin
a tax, a tribute, Irish cin, Early Irish cin, statute, law: *kap-ni-, root qap, as in cil? Stokes refers it to the root kâs, order, Sanskrit çâs (do.), Latin castigare, castus, Gothic hazjan, praise. Hence Scottish cain.
cin
white: from Latin ca@-nus.
cin
scold, revile, Irish cin, Middle Irish cined, scolding: *kag-niô or kakniô(?); Greek @Gkahzw, laugh, @Gkaghzw, Latin cachinnus; Old High German huohôn, mock; Sanskrit kakhati, laugh.
cainb
hemp, Irish cnib, Middle Breton canap; from Latin cannabis, allied to English hemp.
caineal
cinnamon; from Scottish and obsolete English cannel, canel, cinnamon, from Old Greek canelle, from Latin canella, dim. of canna, cane.
caingeann
a fine (Heb.), Irish caingean, a rule, case, compact, etc.:
Caingis
Pentecost, Irish cingcis, Early Irish Cingcigais; from the Latin quinquagesima (dies, 50th day from the Passover).
cainneag
a mote:
cainneag
a hamper (Skye):
cainnt
speech, Irish caint; from can, say, q.v. Stokes gives the stem as *kan(s)ti, root kans, Skr çasti, prise, from çams, speak, Latin censeo.
caiptean
a captain, Irish, Middle Irish caiptn; from Middle English capitain, from Old French capitaine, Latin capitaneus, caput, head.
cir
a blaze, sea foam, etc.; See rather caoir.
cir
the gum, Irish cir (cairib, Fol.):
cir
a peat moss, dry part of the peat moss (Dial.); from English carr, boggy ground, Norse kjarr, brushwood. Also cthar, q.v.
cairb
the bent ridge of a cart saddle srathair. Shaw gives further the meanings "plank, ship, fusec (cairb a' ghunna) (Rob), chariot"; Irish corb, coach. The word is the primary stem from which carbad, chariot, springs; See carbad. As "fusee" or "fisil", i.e., "musket", it seems a curtailed form of cairbinn.
cairbh
a carcase, carrion; also cairb (Dial.); allied to corpus?
cairbhist
carriage, tenants' rent service; from Middle English cariage, in all senses (Cf. the charter terms - "Areage and cariage and all due service"), now carriage.
cairbinn
a carabine; from the English
cairbinneach
a toothless person (Sh.); from ++cairb a jaw, gum, Irish cairb. See cairb above.
cairc
flesh, person:
cird
a delay, respite, Irish cirde; cf. Old Irish cairde, pactum. A special legal use of a word which originally means "friendship". See cirdeas.
cirdeas
friendship, so Irish, Old Irish cairdes; from caraid, q.v.
cireag
a prating girl (Sh., who gives caireog); probably from cir, gum: "having jaw".
caireal
noise; See coirioll.
++cairfhiadh
a hart or stag, Irish cirrfhiadh: *carbh-fhiadh. For *carbh, a deer; cf. Welsh carw, hart, stag, Cornish caruu, Breton caru; Latin carvus; Greek @Gkeras, horned.
cirich
mend, Irish cirighim, Early Irish craigim, arrange, from cir, q.v. Cf. cairim, sutor, Z. 775.
cairidh
a weir, Irish cora, Middle Irish coraidh for cora, g. corad, Welsh cored, Old Welsh and Old Breton coret, from Celtic korjô, I set, put. See cuir.
cairgein
sea moss, Irish moss, Eng carrageen, so named from Carragheen (Waterford), in Ireland. This place name is a dim. of carraig, rock.
cairis
corpse, carcase; founded on Middle English cors, Scottish corrssys (pl. in Blind Harry), now corse.
cairmeal
wild liquorice; See carra-meille.
cairnean
an egg-shell:
cairt
bark (of a tree), Irish cairt; Latin cortex; root qert, cut, Lithuanian kert, cut, English rend.
cairt
a cart, so Irish, Welsh cart; from the English cart.
cairt
a card, so Irish; Gaelic is from Scottish carte, which is direct from the French carte. The English modifies the latter form into card. The are all from Latin charta, paper. Early Irish cairt meant "parchment".
cairt
cleanse, Irish cartaighim, Early Irish cartaim, Welsh carthu, purge, kar-to-. The root idea is a "clearing out"; the root ker, kar, separate, is allied to sker in ascart, and especially in sgar.
cairteal
a quarter; from Late Latin quartellus, Norse kvartill, Latin quartus, fourth.
caisbheart, cais'eart
foot gear (shoes or boots), Irish coisbheart; from cas+ beart, q.v.
caisd
listen, Irish coisteacht, listening, Early Irish coistim, Old Irish coitsea, auscultet: co-tsim, co and isd, listen, q.v. O'R. gives the modern Irish cisdeacht with o long, which would seem the most natural result from co-isd.
cise
chese, Irish, Early Irish cise, Welsh caws, Breton kaouz; from Latin ca@-seus, whence English cheese.
caiseal
bulwark, castle, Irish caiseal, Early Irish caisel, caissle; from Latin castellum.
caisean
anything curled, etc.; from cas, curled, q.v.
caisg
check, stop, Irish coisgim, Old Irish cosc, castigare, Welsh cosp, *kon-sqo-, *seqô, I say; Latin inseque; Greek @Ge@'/nnepe, say, @Ge@'/ni-spe, dixit; English say, German sagen.
Cisg
Easter, Irish Cisg, Old Irish csc, Welsh pasc; from Latin pascha, English paschal.
caisil-chr
a bier, bed of blood, Middle Irish cosair chr, bed of blood - to denote a violent death, Early Irish cosair, bed. the expression appears in the Ossianic Ballads, and folk-etymology is responsible for making Gaelic casair into caisil, bulwark. The word cosair has been explained as co-ster-, root ster, strew, Latin sternere, English strew.
caisleach
a ford, footpath; from cas-lach, rather than cas-slighe, foot-way.
caislich
stir up, caisleachadh, shaking up, etc.; from cas, sudden.
caismeachd
an alarm (of battle), signal, march tune. The corresponding Irish is caismirt, alarm, battle, Middle Irish caismert, Early Irish cosmert.
caisrig
consecrate; See coisrigeadh.
caisteal
a castle, Middle Irish castl, Early Irish castall; from Latin castellum, whence English castle.
citeach
a rush mat for measuring corn, Irish citeach, winnowing sheet; from cite, winnowed, from cth.
caiteag
a small bit (H.S.D.), a basket for trouts (M`A. for Islands), basket (Sh.), a place to hold barley in (M`L.). For the first sense, cf. Welsh cat, a piece, Scottish cat, a rag. In Irish Latin the trout was called catus (Giraldus).
caiteas
scraped linen, applied for the stoppage of wounds (M`F.); from Scottish caddis, lint for wounds, Middle English cadas, caddis, cotton wool, floss silk for padding, from Old French cadas. See Gaelic catas. caiteas = sawdust, scrapings (M`D.).
caitein
nap of cloth, shag, Irish caitn, catkin of the osier, little cat. The English words caddis, catkin, and cotton seem to be mixed up as the basis of the Gaelic and Irish words. Cf. Welsh ceden, shaggy hair.
caith
spend, cast, Irish, Old Irish caithim, *katjô, I consume, castaway; Sanskrit çâtayati, sever, cast down, destroy, çât-ana, causing to fall, wearing out, root çt. Allied to the root of cath, war.
caithear
just, right, Irish caithear (Lh.), caithfidh, it behoves, Middle Irish caithfid; from caith, doubtless ( Atk.).
caithream
shout of joy, triumph, Irish caithrim; from cath, battle, and rim, a shout, Early Irish rm. This last word Strachan refers to the root req (*rec-m or *rec-s-m), Church Slavonic reka@?, speak, Lith. re@?ki.
caithris
night-watching:
cl
kail, cabbage, Irish cl, Welsh cawl, Cornish caul, Breton kaol; from Latin caulis, a stalk, whence likewise English cole (colewort) and Scottish kail.
cala, caladh
a harbour, Irish caladh, Middle Irish calad. It is usual to correlate this with It. cala, French cale, bay, cove (Diez, Thurneysen, Windisch), and Stokes even says the Gaelic and Irish words are borrowed from a Romance *calatum, It. calata, cala, French cale, cove. More probably the Celtic root is qel, qal, hide, as in English hollow, Middle English holh, hollow, cave, also English hole, possibly. the root of cladh, has also been suggested.
caladair
calendar, Irish calaindir; from Middle English kalendar, through French from Latin calendarium, an account-book, from calendæ, the Calends or first of the month.
calaman
a dove; the common form of the literary columan, q.v.
calanas
spinning of wool; seemingly founded on Latin colus, distaff. See cuigeal.
++calbh
head, pate, bald, so Irish, Early Irish calb; from Latin calva, scalp, calvus, bald. H.S.D. gives as a meaning "promontory", and instances "Aoineadh a' Chailbh Mhuilich", which surely must be the Calf of Mull; and Calf is a common name for such subsidiary isles - from Norse klfr, English calf. Cognate with Latin calva, calvaria (St. Lec.).
calbh
a shoot, osier, twig, Irish colbha, plant stalk, sceptre, hazel tree, Early Irish colba, wand; See colbh.
calbh
gushing of water or blood (H.S.D.) from calbh?
calbhair
greedy of food (Suth.); from cil?
calc
drive, ram, caulk, Irish calcaim; from Latin calco, calx, the heel, English in-culcate.
caldach
sharp, pointed ( Sh., M`L.):
calg
awn, beard of corn, bristles, Irish calg, colg, Early Irish colg, a sword, Old Welsh colginn, aristam, Welsh cola, beard of corn, sting, caly, penis, Breton calc'h (do.), kalgo-, *kolgo-; Greek @Gkolobs, stunted; Gothic halks, poor; further is Latin cellere, hit, culter, knife; etc. The main root is qel, qlâ, hit, break; See claidheamh, cladh. The Caledonian hero Calgocos derives his name hence. Hence calg-dhreach, direct, "sword-straight" to a place.
call
loss, Irish caill, Early Irish coll, Welsh coll, Cornish colled, jactura, Middle Breton coll, *koldo-; English halt, Gothic halts, Old High German halz, lame; root qel, as in calg.
calla, callda
tame, callaidh (M`A., also Sh., who gives the meaning "active" to the last form); cf. Welsh call, wise; from Latin callidus?
callag, calltag
the black guillemot, diver; compare English quail, French caille.
callaid
a partition, fence; the same as tallaid, q.v.?
caillaid
a wig, cap (M`F.); from English calott, skull-cap.
callan
a noise, Irish calln, callich; from English call?


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