MacBain's Dictionary - Section 11

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creadhonadh
a twitching, piercing pain (Heb.); possibly for cneadh-ghonadh, "wound-piercing".
creag
a rock, so Irish; a curtailed form of carraig. Also (Dialectically) craig. Hence English crag.
creamh
garlic, Irish creamh, earlier crem, Welsh craf; Greek @Gkrmuon, onion; Anglo-Saxon hramse, English ramsons; Lithuanian kermsze@?, wild garlic.
crean, crion
quake, tear up (Carm.):
creanair
sedition ( Arms.; not H.S.D.), so Irish ( O'R.):
creanas
whetting or hacking of sticks (M`F.; H.S.D. considers it Dialectic), neat-handed (M`L.):
creapall
entanglin, hindering, so Irish; it is an Irish word evidently, from Lh.; founded on English cripple.
creapall
a garter, crepailld (Skye); (Arms. creapull):
creathach
(faded) underwood, firewood, Irish creathach, hurdle, brushwood, faggots (O'R.): *kr@.to-; cf. cron.
creathall
cradle, from Northern Middle English credil, Scottish creddle, English cradle, Anglo-Saxon cradol. Further derivation at present uncertain (Murray).
creathall
a lamprey:
creatrach
a wilderness, so Irish ( Lh., etc.); M`A. gives the word, but it is clearly Irish Cf. creathach.
creic
sell, Middle Irish creicc, sale, Early Irish creic, buying, Old Irish crenim, I buy, Welsh prynn, buy; Sanskrit krînami (do.). There seems a confusion in Gaelic and Early Irish with the word reic, sell, q.v.
creid
believe, Irish creidim, Old Irish cretim, Welsh credu, Cornish cresy, Breton cridiff, *kreddiô, Old Irish cretim, Welsh credu, Cornish cresy, Breton cridiff, *kreddiô; Latin cred; Sanskrit çrad-dadhâmi. From cred-dô, "I give heart to".
creigeir
a grapple (M`D.); from some derivative of Norse krækja, to hook, krækill, a crooked stick, English crook?
creim, creidhm
gnaw, chew, nibble, Irish creimim, creidhmim, Middle Irish crim. Irish is also creinim, Welsh cnithio, cnoi (which also means "gnaw"): from knet, knen, kno@-, ken, bite, scratch, as in cnmh, q.v. The n of kn early becomes r because of the m or n after the first vowel.
crein
suffer for (Welsh H.. Allied to the Old Irish crenim, buy: "You will buy for it!" See under creic.
cris
grease; from Scottish creische, from Old French craisse, cress, from Latin crass, crassus, thick. English grease is of like origin.
creithleag
a gadful, so Irish (Fol.), Middle Irish crebar, Welsh crëyr, root creb, scratch? Cf. Lettic kribint, gnaw off. Irish creabhar, horse-fly.
creth
wound, hurt (Dialectic), Irish creo, a wound (O'R.); creonadh, being pained: *krevo- as in cr, blood.
creubh, creubhag
cr, the body; cf. Middle Irish cr, *kreivio-, flesh, body; Gothic hraiva-, Norse hrae, body, Old High German hreô, corpse. It is possible to refer cr, cr to *krepi-, Latin corpus, Old High German href, Anglo-Saxon hrif, body, English mod-riff. Stokes: cr, kr@.pes.
creubh
dun, crave; from the English crave.
creubhaidh
tender in health; seemingly from creubh.
creuchd
wound, Irish crachd, Old Irish crcht, Welsh craith, scar, creithen, Middle Breton creizenn (do.), *crempto-; root kerp, ker, Lithuanian kerp, cut, Sanskrit kr@.pana, sword (Strachan). Stokes gives the Celtic as krekto-s, and Bez. cfs. Norse hrekja, worry. This neglects the of Gadelic.
creud
what, Irish creud, crad, Early Irish crt; for ce rt. See co and rud.
creud
creed, Irish cridh, Middle Irish credo, Welsh credo; from Latin credo, I believe; the first word of the Apostles' Creed in Latin
creutair
creature, Irish cratr, Welsh creadwr; from Latin creatura.
criadh
clay, so Irish Really the oblique form of cr, q.v.
criathar
a sieve, Irish, Old Irish criathar, Old Welsh cruitr, Cornish croider, Middle Breton croezr, *kreitro-; Anglo-Saxon hridder, hriddel, English riddle, German reiter; further Latin crîbrum (*kri- @Gq??ro-n); root kri, krei, separate, whence Greek @Gkrnw, English critic, etc.
criachadh
proposing to oneself; from croch, end. Cf. English de fine, from finis and end, used for "purpose".
cridhe
heart, Irish croidhe, Old Irish cride, Welsh craidd, Breton kreis, middle, *krdjo-n; Greek @Gkrada, @Gkarda; Latin cor, cordis; English heart, German herz; Lithuanian szirdis.
crlein
a small creel ( M`E.), a box, small coffer ( H.S.D.), crilein ( Arms., M`L.), a box, Irish criln, Early Irish criol, coffer, *krêpolo. criol (Arran, Perth). Stokes gives the stem as krêpo-, and Bez. adds Sanskrit çu@-/rpa, winnowing basket (Cf. for phonetics lon, and Sanskrit pûrna, full). Scottish, English creel, which appears about 1400, is usually derived hence; but as the Gaelic form itself is doubtful, and, from all appearance, taken from Lh., it is best to look elsewhere for an etymology for creel, as, through French, from Latin craticula. The Gaelic criol exists only in Sh., who found it in Lh. See croidhleag.
croch
end, Irish croch, Old Irish crch, *krîka,from the root krei, separate, as in criathar, q.v. Stokes and Bezzenberger join Welsh crip, a comb, and compare Lithuanian kreikti, strew, and, for sense, appeal to the German, English strand, "the strewed", Old Slavonic strana, side. It has also been referred to the root of Latin circus, circle, Greek @Gkrkos.
criom
nibbling, criomag, a bit; See creim.
cron
little, withered, Irish cron, Early Irish crn, Welsh crin, fragile, dry, Breton krin, *kre@-no-s; the root kre@- appears to belong to root ke@-r, kera, destroy, Sanskrit çr@.n@.a@-/mi, break, rend, Latin caries, decay, Greek @Ga@'kc/ratos, pure, untouched, Gothic hairus, sword. Stokes allies it to Sanskrit çrân@.a, cooked, çrâ, cook, possibly a form of the root kera, mix, Greek @Gkramai, mix.
crioncanachd
a strife, quarrelsomeness, Irish croncnachd: an Irish word from Lh., apparently. Perhaps cron-cn, "small reviling".
crionna
attentive to small things, prudent, so Irish (cronna, Con.); also dialectic cronda, which shows its connection with cron. Cf. Welsh crintach, sordid.
criopag
a wrinkle, Irish criopg; founded on English crimp, crumple. M`A. has criopag, a clew of yarn.
crios
a belt, girdle, so Irish, Old Irish criss, fo-chridigedar, accingat, Welsh crys, shirt, Early Welsh crys, belt, Middle Breton crisaff, succingere, Breton kreis, middle. Bez. suggests comparison with Lithuanian skrituly/s, circle, knee-cap, skreiste@?, mantle. It has been referred also to the root krid of cridhe, heart.
Crosdaidh
a Christian, Irish Criosduighe, Middle Irish cristaige; from the Gaelic Crosd, Irish Crosda, Christ; from Latin Christus, Greek @GHriosts, the Anointed One.
criostal
a crystal, so Ir; from the English
criot
an earthen vessel (Dialect, H.S.D.), Irish criotamhail, earthen, made of clay ( O'Br.), criot, an earthen vessel ( O'R.):
criotaich
caress; See cniadaich.
criplich
a cripple; from the English cripple.
crith
shake, quiver, Irish, Early Irish crith, Welsh cryd, Old Welsh crit, *kritu-; Anglo-Saxon hriða, fever, German ritten, fever. See crath, to which crith has been suggested as cognate (root kr@.t, krot, kret.
critheann, critheach
the aspen tree, Irish crann-critheach; from crith.
cr
a sheep cot, pen, Irish cr, Middle Irish cr caerach, ovile, cr na muice, pig-stye, Welsh craw, hovel, pig-stye, Breton kraou, crou, stable, *krâpo-s, a stye, roof; Anglo-Saxon hrf, English roof, Norse hrf, a shed (Stokes). The Norse kr, small pen, Scottish croo, seem borrowed.
cr.1
the eye of a needle, Irish, Early Irish cr, Welsh crau, Middle Breton cräo, Breton kraouenn.
++cr
blood, Early Irish cr, cr, Welsh crau, Cornish crow, *krovo-s; Latin cruor, gore; Lithuanian krajas, blood; Sanskrit kravis, raw flesh; Greek @Gkras, flesh; English raw.
++cr.1
death, Irish, Early Irish cr. From the same origin as cr, blood. This is the Scottish cro, the weregild of the various individuals in the Scoto-Celtic Kingdom, from the king downwards.
crc
beat, pound (Dialectic, H.S.D.):
crc
a branch of a deer's horn; cf. Norse krkr, English crook.
crcan
a crook; from the Norse krkr, English crook.
croch
hang, Irish crochaim, croch, a cross, gallows, Early Irish croch, cross, Welsh crog; from the Latin crux, crucis.
crch
saffron, Irish crch; from Latin crocus, from Greek @Gkrkos, crocus, and its product saffron.
crodh
cattle, Irish crodh, a dowry, cattle, Middle Irish crod, wealth (cattle): *krodo-, Indo-European qordh, qerdh; English herd, German herde; Lithuanian kerdz@?us, herd (man), Church Slavonic creda, a herd; Sanskrit çardhas, a troop.
crdha
valiant, Irish crdha, Early Irish crda, valiant, cruel, *croudavo-s, "hardy"; root croud of cruaidh, q.v.
crodhan
hoof, parted hoof, Irish crobhn, a little hoof or paw, See crubh.
crog
an earthen vessel, crogan, a pitcher, Irish crogn, pitcher, Early Irish crocann, olla, Welsh crochan, *krokko-; Greek @Gkrwsss, pitcher ( @G*krwkjos); to which are allied, by borrowing somehow, English crock, Anglo-Saxon crocca, Norse krukka, German krug. Gaelic and Welsh phonetics (Gaelic g = Welsh ch.) are unsatisfactory. Schrader derives these words from Old Irish crocenn, skin - a "skin" vessel being the original.
crog
an aged ewe; from the Scottish crock; cf. Norw. krake, a sickly beast, Fries. krakke, broken-down horse, etc.
crg
large hand, hand in paw form, *crobhag, Irish crobh, hand from wrist to fingers, paw, hoof, Old Irish crob, hand. See crubh.
crogaid
a beast with small horns (M`A.); from crog?
crogan
a gnarled tree (Arg.); cf. crcan.
crgan
thornbush (Arg.), from crg, Welsh crafanc, claw.
cric
foam on spirits, rage, difficulty, cast sea-weed:
croich
gallows, Irish croch, gallows, cross, Early Irish croch, cross, Welsh crogbren, gallows; from Latin crux, crucis.
crid
a sumptuous present (Heb.); See cnid.
cridh
pen cattle, house corn; from cr. Dialectic for latter meaning is crdhadh.
croidhleag
a basket, amall creel; See crlein.
crilean
a little fold, a group; from cr.
crois
a cross, so Irish, Early Irish cross, Welsh croes; from Latin crux.
croistara, cranntara
also -tra, -tarra, the fiery cross: crois+tara; See crois above. As to tara, cf. the Norse tara, war (Cam.).
croit
a hump, hillock, Irish croit, Welsh crwth, a hunch, harp, croth, a protuberant part (as calf of leg), *crotti-; from krot, kurt, root kur, round, as in cruinn, cruit, q.v.
croit
a croft; from the English croft. In the sense of "vulva", cf. Welsh croth, Breton courz, which Stokes refers to cruit, harp; but the Gaelic may be simply a metaphorical use of croit, croft.
crlot
wound dangerously; cr+ lot, q.v.
crm
bent, Irish Early Irish crom, Old Irish cromm, Welsh crwm, Breton krom, Old Breton crum, krumbo-; from the same root as cruinn? The Anglo-Saxon crumb, crooked, English crumple, German krumm, have been compared, and borrowing alleged, some holding that the Teutons borrowed from the Celts, and vice versa. Dr Stokes holds that the Celts are the borrowers. The Teutonic and Celtic words do not seem to be connected at all in reality. It is an accidental coincidence, which is bound to happen sometimes, and the wonder is it does not happen oftener.
cromadh
measure the length of the middle finger, Irish cruma, cromadh; from crom.
croman
kite, hawk, from crom.
cron
fault, harm, Irish cronaim, I bewitch; cf. Middle Irish cron, rebuking. The idea is that of being "fore-spoken" by witchcraft. See cronaich.
cronaich
rebuke, Irish cronuighim, Middle Irish cronaigim, cron, rebuking, Early Irish air-chron (do.), *kruno-; cf. Teutonic hru, noise, Norse rmr, shouting, Anglo-Saxon hram, a din.
crnan
a dirge, croon, purring, Irish, Early Irish cronn. O'Curry (Mann. and Cust. III., 246) writes the Irish as crnn, and defines it as the low murmuring or chorus to each verse of the aidbsi or choral singing. Scottish croon, croyn (15th century), corresponds to Dutch kreunen, groan, Middle Dutch krönon, lament, Middle Low German kronen, growl, Old High German chrônan, Middle Low German kroenen, chatter (Murray, who thinks the Scottish came from Low German in Middle English period). It seems clear that the Gadelic and Teutonic are related to each other by borrowing; seemingly the Gadelic is borrowed.
cropan
deformed person (Suth.); from Norse kroppinn, deformed. See under crb.
crosach
crossing, thwarting, Irish crosanta; also Gaelic crosan (and crostan), a peevish man; all from cros, the basis of crois, cross, q.v.
crosanachd
from crosan, poet, chorister.
crosda
perverse, irascible, so Irish; from the Gaelic base cros of crois, cross.
crotal
lichen, especially for dyeing, cudbear: *crottal; *crot-to-, from krot, cf. Greek @Gkrotw/nc, an excrescence on a tree. Hence Scottish crottle. Middle Irish crotal means "husk" (which may be Gaelic crotal above), "kernel, cymbal". In the last two senses the word is from the Latin crotalum, a rattle; the Irish used a small pear-shaped bell or rattle, whence the Irish English crotal (Murray).
cruach
a pile, heap, Irish, Early Irish cruach, Welsh crug, Cornish cruc, Old Breton cruc, *kroukâ; Lithuanian kruti, to pile, krvi, heap; Norse krga, heap. Others have compared the Norse hraukr, a small stack, Anglo-Saxon hrec, English rick.
cruachan, cruachainn
hip, upper part of the hip, Early Irish cruachait; from cruach, heap, hump. Stokes translates the Irish as "chine", and considers it like the corresponding German kreuz, derived from Latin crûcem, cross. The Gaelic meaning is distinctly against this.
cruaidh
hard, Irish cruaidh, Old Irish cruaid, *kroudi-s; root kreva, to be blood, raw, whence cr, blood, q.v.; Latin crûdus, English crude. Hence cruailinn, hard, rocky.
crb
squat, crouch, Irish crbadh, to bend, crook; also Gaelic crbach, cripple, Irish do. ; from Norse krjpa, to creep, kneel (English creep, etc.), kroppinn, crippled, root kreup, krup, as in English cripple, Scottish cruppen thegether, contracted, bowed. Cf. Welsh crwb, bent.
crb
bed recess (Carm.):
crban
the crab-fish, Irish crban, Welsh crwban. From crb above.
crubh
a horse's hoof, Irish crobh, paw, hoof, Early Irish cr, *kruvo-, hoof; Zend çrva, çruva, nail, horn; further Greek @Gkras, horn, and crn, q.v. (Stokes).
crudha
horse shoe, Irish crdh: seemingly from crubh.
cridein
the king-fisher, Irish cruidn:
cruidhean
paw (Arms.) = cribhean.
cruimh
a worm, Irish cnuimh, Old Irish cruinn, Welsh, Cornish pryf, Breton prenv, *qr@.mi-; Lithuanian ki??rmis, Lettic srms; Sanskrit kr@.mis, krmis.
cruinn
round, so Irish, Old Irish cruind, Welsh crwn, Breton krenn, *krundi-s; root kuro-, circle, turn, as in car, q.v. Cf. Latin curvus; Greek @Gkurts, bunt, @Gkorw/nc, ring, Latin corona, English crown. Bezzenberger cfs. the form crundi- from kur to Latin rotundus from rota.
crisgein
a lamp, jug, Irish crisgn; from Middle English cruskyn, from Old French creusequin, from Teutonic krûs, whence English cruse.
crisle, cridse
mausoleum, hollow vault of a church; from Middle English cruddes, vault, crypt, crowd, by-form of English crypt.
cruit
a harp, so Irish, Old Irish crot, Welsh crwth, fidicula, Late Latin (600 A.D.) chrotta, *krotta: krot-ta-, from krot, kurt, root kur, as in Gaelic cruinn, round, q.v., Greek @Gkurts (do.): "the curved instrument". Stokes refers it to the root krot, strike, as in Greek @Gkrotw, rattle, clap. Hence English crowd.
cruithneachd, cruineachd
wheat, Irish cruithneachd, Old Irish cruithnecht: *kr@.t-on-, root kert, ker, cut, "that which is cut"; Lithuanian kert, cut; Greek @Gkerw, Latin curtus, etc. (Rhys). It has been compared to the Latin Ceres, English cereal, and Latin cresco, creo, as in cruth.
crlaist
a rocky hill (H.S.D., from MSS.); from cruaidh? Cf. cruailinn.
crumag
the plant skirret; Scottish crummock. From Gaelic crom (Cameron).
cruman
the hip bone, Irish crumn, hip bone, crooked surgical instrument; from crom.
crn
crown, Irish crn; from Middle English crune, from Old French coronne, from Latin corona.
crunnluadh
a quick measure in pipe music: cruinn+ luath.
crup
crouch, contract, Irish crupaim; founded on the Middle English cruppel, cripple, a root crup, appearing in Scottish cruppen, contracted. See crbach.
crsbal
crucible (Hend.).
cruscladh
wrinkling:
cruth
form, figure, Old Irish cruth, Welsh pryd, *qr@.tu-s, root qer, make; Latin cerus, creator, creo, English create; Lithuanian kuri, build; Sanskrit kar, make, kr@.tas, made.
cruthach
placenta of mare:
c
a dog, Irish, Old Irish c, g. con, Welsh ci, pl. cwn, Cornish, Breton ki, pl. Breton koun, *kuô, g. *kunos; Greek @Gkwn; Latin canis; English hound; Sanskrit çvâ, g. çnas.
cuach
a cup, bowl, Irish cuachg, Old Irish cach: Latin caucus, Greek @Gkau@nka; Sanskrit koça. It is generally held that cuach is borrowed from the Latin, though phonetically they may be cognate. Thw Welsh cawg is certainly borrowed.
cuach
curl, so Irish; from the above.
cuag
an awkward curve, kink, an excrescence on the heel; also guag (Dialectic): *kouggâ, *kouk-gâ; root qeuq, bend; Sanskrit kuc, bend. Lithuanian kuku, hook?
cu'ag, cubhag
cuckoo, Irish cuach, Old Irish cach, Welsh côg, of onomatopoetic origin - from the cuckoo's cry of kuku, whence English cuckoo, Latin cucûlus, Greek @Gkkkux, Sanskrit kôkilas, koka.
cuailean
the hair, a lock, curl, Irish cuailen (Stokes). This Stokes refers to a stem *koglenno-, and cfs. Greek @Gkhlos, a spiral-shelled shell-fish, @Gkohlas, spiral-shelled snail, Latin cochlea. As the Greek may be for hhlos, the derivation is uncertain. Irish cuailn, a bundle, faggot, suggests that a similar derivation from cual was used metaphorically for a "bundle or cord of hair".
cuaille
a club, bludgeon, Irish, Early Irish cuaille, *kaullio-; Greek @Gkauls, stalk; Latin caulis, stalk; Lithuanian kulas, a bone (Stokes). It may, however, be for *coud-s-lio-, from qoud, Latin cûdo, strike.
cuairsg
roll, wreathe, so Irish; from cuairt, with the termination -sqô.
cuairt
circuit, so Irish, Old Irish cairt. Stokes gives the stem as kukr@.ti, from kur, circle, as in cruinn.
cual
a faggot, burden of sticks, Irish cual, Middle Irish cual, heap, *kuglo-, root kug, qeu@g; English heap; Latin cumulus (=cub-lus?); Lithuanian kgis, heap.
cuallach
herding or tending cattle:
cuallach
society, family, Irish cuallaidheachd, society, cuallaidhe, a companion:
cuan
the ocean, Irish, Middle Irish cuan, harbour, copno-; Norse köfn, German hafen, English haven.
cuanal, cuantal
a company, a band of singers, flocks (Carm.), Early Irish can, host, *koupn-, Lithuanian kupa, heap, English heap(?).
cuanna, cuannar
handsome, fine, Irish cuanna; also cuanta, robust, neat: *kaun-navos, from kaun, skaun; German schön.
++cuar
crooked, Irish cuar, Early Irish car, *kukro-, root kuc, bend; Sanskrit kucati, bend, Lithuanian kuku@?, hook (Strachan). But cf. cuairt.
cuaradh
paining, tormenting; cf. Welsh cur, pain, care, curio, beat. The Dictionaries refer the word to cirr, as a Dialectic form.
cuaran
a brogue, sock, Irish cuarg, Middle Irish carn, Welsh curan, a covering for the foot and leg *kourano-, "mocassin": *keu-ro-; root keu, ku, as in Latin cu-tis, skin, English hide, Anglo-Saxon hy/d (*kût-).
cuartach
a fever (Arg.); from cuairt.
cuartag
ringworm (Hend.):
cuas
a cave; See cs.
ciat
sweetheart (Carm.):
cb
a tumbril, box-cart; from Scottish coop, coup, box-cart, etc., probably the same as English coop, basket. Dialectic coba.
cbaid
pulipt; ultimately from Latin pulpitum, a speaking platform, whence English pulpit, Scottish poopit. Dialectic bbaid.
cbair
a cooper; from the English
cubhag
cuckoo; See cu'ag.
cubhaidh
fit, so Irish, Old Irish cobaid, fit, cubaithiu, concinnior: *convedo-, "suiting"; root ved, bind, as in feadhainn.
cbhraidh
fragrant, Irish cumhra, cmhra, Middle Irish cumra, cumrae, Early Irish cumrai (i n-aballgort chumrai); *com-rae:
cubhraig, cubhrainn
a coverlet; founded on the English cover, coverlet. Dialectic cuibhlig.
cuchailte
a residence (Arms.; not H.S.D.), Irish, cuclaidhe; *concladh-; from cladh, q.v.
cudaig
the fish cuddy, young of the coalfish, Irish cudg, cdog, haddock, *cod-do-; English haddock? Scottish cuddy, cudden, may be of Gaelic origin (Murray). A.so cudainn.
cdainn
a large bushel or tub; cf. Norse ktr, cask, Scottish coodie, quiddie, small tub. Middle Irish cuidin, coithin, catînus, is probably from a Celt. kotîno-, Greek @Gkotlc, cup, Latin catînus, a dep vessel.
cudrom, cudthrom
weight: *con-trom-, "co-heavy"; Old Irish cutrumme, similis. See trom. Dialectic cuideam.
cugann
delicacy, "kitchen", Early Irish cuicen; from Latin coquina.
cugan
food (Carm.):
cugar
mab, or wild cat (Carm.):
cugullach
precarious, unstable (Carm.):
cuibheas
sufficiency:
cuibheasach
tolerable, middling, Irish cuibheasach, decent, pretty good, fairly good (in health), cuibheas, decency, cuibhe, decent. See cubhaidh for stem. The Irish cuibhe shows that it is possible to derive the word from *con-vesu-, root vesu of feabhas.
cuibhle, cuibhill
a wheel; from English wheel.
cubhne
deer's horn ( Arms., M`L.), deer's tibia ( H.S.D.):
cuibhreach
a bond, chain, so Irish, Old Ir cuimrech, vb. conriug, ligo, Welsh rhwym, vinculum, Breton rum, kevre, *kom-rigo-n; rigo-, a bond; Latin corrigia, shoe-lace; Middle High German ric, band, string. Stokes (rightly) now gives root is rek, bind, Sanskrit raçana, cord, rope, raçmi (do.).
cuibhrig
cover, coverlet; See cubhraig.
cuibhrionn
portion, so Irish, Early Irish cuibrend, Welsh cyfran: *com-rann; See rann.
cuicheineach
coquetting, secretly hobnobbing (Arg.): co-ceann.
cuid
share, part, Irish cuid, g. coda, Old Irish cuit, Welsh peth, res, pars, Cornish peth, Breton pez, *qezdi-, *qozdi-; qes, qos, seemingly from the pron. root qo, qe (see co). Cf. Latin quotidie, quota, Breton ped, how much. Bezzenberger compares Lithuanian kede@?ti, burst, Slavonic ce@?sti, part; root qed. Hence English piece. Some have suggested comparison with Latin costa, rib, English coast.
cuideachd
company, Irish cuideachda, Old Irish cotecht, coitio, conventus: *con-techt; See teachd.
cuideag
a spider ( H.S.D.), Irish cuideog ( O'R.):
cuideal
pride ( Arms.), cuidealas ( M`A.); from cuid?
cuideam
weight; See cudrom.
cuidh, cuith
inclosure (Barra); from Norse ku, Orkney quoy, a pen, Orkney and Shetland quey, quay, enclosed land.
cuidhe
wreath of snow; See cuith.
cuidhtich
quit, requite, Irish citighim; from English quit?
cuidich
assist, Irish cuidighim, Middle Irish cuitigim, share; from cuid.
cuidridh
common ( Sh.; not H.S.D.), Irish cuidri(dh), entertainment, commons: *con-trebi-, as in caidreabh?
cuifein
the wadding of a gun; from Scottish colfin.
cuigeal
a distaff, so Irish, Middle Irish cuigel, Welsh cogail, Cornish cigel, Breton kegel; from Middle Latin conucula, for colucula, from colus. From Latin conucula comes German kunkel, French quenouille.
cil
corner, recess, Irish cil, Old Irish cuil, Welsh cil, *kûli-. See cl
cuilbheart
a wile, trick; from cil+ beart.
cuilbheir
a gun; from the English culverin.
cuilc
reed, cane, Irish cuilc, *kolki-; root kol, as in Latin culmus, stalk, Greek @Gklamos, reed, English haulm.
cuile
an apartment where stores are kept, Old Irish cuile fnda, vinaria, *koliâ; Greek @Gkala, hut, Sanskrit kula@-/ya, hut, nest (Stokes); from *kol-io-, root qel of ceil.
cuileag
a fly, Irish and Early Irish cuil, Welsh cylion, flies, Cornish kelionen, Breton quelyenen, *kuli-s, kuliâno-s; Latin culex.
cileagan
feast (in a corner) (Carm.).
cuilean
a whelp, Irish cuilen (O'Br.), cuileann (O'R.), Early Irish culn, Welsh colwyn, Cornish coloin, catulus, Breton kolenn, young of quadrupeds; Greek @Gklla= @Gsklaz, whelp (Bez.). It may be from c, *kun, dog. Ernault, *culenos: root of @Gkos; Middle Breton colen, so D'Arbois. Rhys says Welsh borrowed.
cuilidh
cellar, secret place, treasury; See cuile.
cuilionn
holly, so Irish, Early Irish cuilenn, Welsh celyn, Cornish celin, Breton kelenn (pl.), *kolenno-; English holly, Anglo-Saxon holegn
cuilm
a feast; Dialectic for cuirm, q.v.
cuimein
the plant cumin, Irish cumn; from Latin cuminum, English cumin.
cuimhne
rememberance, so Irish, Old Irish cuman, cuimnech, memor, Welsh cof, Cornish cov, Middle Breton couff, *co-men; root men, as in Latin memini, I remember, English mention, mind, etc.
cuimir
brief, handsome, so Irish, Early Irish cumbair, *com-berro-; for berr, see berr.
cuimrig
trouble; See coimrig.
cuimse
a mark, aim, moderation, Irish cuimse; from com-+ meas; See meas. Cf. eirmis.


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