MacBain's Dictionary - Section 7

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calltuinn
hazel, Irish Early Irish coll, Welsh collen, Cornish coll-widen. Middle Breton quel-vezenn, *koslo-; Latin corylus; Norse hasl, English hazel. *coll+tann.
Calluinn
New Year's Day, Irish callin, Calends, or first day of the month, Early Irish callaind, the Calends, particularly the first Jan., Welsh calan, Calends; from Latin calendæ (English Calends).
calm
a pillar (M`A.), Irish columhan, colbh; from Latin columna, etc.
calm, calma
brave, Irish, Early Irish calma. Cf. Welsh celf, skill, art, celfydd, skilled, Old Breton celmed, efficax. The root cal is to be compared with that in German held, hero, *haleth or *calet. The Indo-European root is qel, as in Latin celsus, high, columna, column, English excel.
calman
dove; See calaman.
calmarra
the pike (Wh.)?
calpa
the calf of the leg, so Irish, Early Irish calpda, bonus pes (Corm.), colpa, tibia; from the Norse klfi, whence also English calf.
calpa
principal set to interest, Scottish calpa, dath-duty payable to the landlord, from Norse kaup, stipulation, pay.
calum
hardness on the skin ( H.S.D.; cathlum in M`D.); from Latin callum, callus. It is not the obsolete caladh, hard, Early Irish calad, Welsh caled, Old Breton calat, *kaleto-, root kal, hard; Gothic hallus, stone, Norse helle, hallr; Sanskrit çilâ, stone.
cam
crooked, one-eyed, Irish cam, Old Irish camm, Welsh cam, Breton kam, Gaulish cambo-, root kemb, wind; Greek kmbos, a band, bond; Lithuanian kinge@?, door-bar. It has been refered to the root of Greek @Gskambs, crooked (se ceum), and to Latin camera, whence English chamber. Hence camag, club, camas, bay.
camag-gharuidh
hoow above the eye, Irish camg-ara, "the bend of the ara", Old Irish aire, Gaelic arach, tempus; Greek @Gparei, cheek.
camart
wry-neck:
camastrang
quarrelsome disputation (M`D.):
camhach
talkative; *com-ag-ach, root ag in adhan?
camhal
a camel, Irish camhall, Early Irish camail, Welsh camyll; from Latin camelus.
camhan
a hollow plain, Irish cabhn (County Cavan); from the Latin cavus.
camhanaich
break of day, twilight, Irish camhaoir; (M`A. sgamhanaich, "lights"):
camlag
a curl:
camp, campa
a camp, Irish, Middle Irish campa; from the English camp.
campar
vexation, grief; from Scottish cummar, English cumber.
can
say, sing, Irish canaim, Old Irish canim, Welsh cana, sing. Breton kana; Latin cano, sing; Greek @Gkanzw; English hen.
cana
porpoise, young whale, Irish cana ( O'R.), cna ( O'Br.), whelp, pup, Middle Irish cana (do.); from Latin canis?
canach
mountain down, cotton Irish canach, Old Irish canach, lanugo; Greek @Gknc@nkos, thistle, @Gkneks, yellow; Sanskrit ka@-ncanas, golden, a plant; *qonak-. Stokes refers it to *casnaka, Latin cânus, white (*casno-), Anglo-Saxon hasu, grey, English hare.
cnain
language, Irish cnamhuin. Seemingly a long-vowel form of the root qan, cry. See cainnt.
canal
cinnamon; See caineal.
canan
a cannon; from the English
canastair
a canister; from the English
cangaruich
fret; from Scottish canker, fret, English canker.
cangluinn
trouble, vexation; from Scottish cangle.
canna
a can, so Irish, Early Irish cann; from English can.
cannach
pretty, kind; *cas-no-, root, qas, Latin ca@-nus, white (casnus), Anglo-Saxon hasu, grey, English haze? Or it may be allied to Latin candidus, white, Sanskrit cand, shine.
canntaireachd
articulate music, chanting, Irish cantaireachd, singing, cntaire, a singer; from Latin cantor, cano, I sing.
cnran
wrangling, grumbling, muttering, Irish cannrn; from can, say, sing.
cantal
grief, weeping ( Sh., M`L.), Irish cantlamh:
caob
a clod, a bite, Irish caob, clod, Middle Irish coep, Early Irish caip, cep, clot, lump, Old Irish caebb oo, jecur.
caoch
empty (as a nut), blind, so Irish, Old Irish caech, Welsh coeg, foolish, Cornish cuic, *kaiko-s; Latin caecus; Gothic haihs, one-eyed.
caoch, caothach
rage; See cuthach.
caochan
a streamlet; from caoth, blind?
caochail
change, die, caochladh, a change, Irish caochluighim, Old Irish caoimchlim cem-chlim: imchloud, imchlad, inversio; for co-imm-clim; from clim, muto: See claoidh. The aspiration of the mn of imb is unusual, but the history of the word is also unusual, for it actually appears as claemchld in Early Irish oftener than once, and Irish claochldh, claochladh.
caod Chaluim-chille
St John's wort (Sh.):
caog
wink; apparently from English cock (the eye). Cf. Norse kaga, keek; Scottish keek; Shet. caog, peep slily.
caogad
fifty, so Irish, Old Irish cica(t), *qenqekont; Latin quinquaginta; Greek @Gpentc/konta. See cig.
caoidh
lamentation, Irish caoi, caoidh, Early Irish ci, ci, inf. to cim, ploro, *keiô, root qei, which appears in caoin, q.v., and in English whine, whisper, etc. Bezzenberger suggests *keipô, and compares Lithuanian szëptis, grimace, Church Slavonic o-sipna@?ti, raucescere. A former derivation of Stokes' is repeated by Rhys (Manx.Pray. @+2, 26): *qesi, root qes as in Latin questus.
caoillean
a twig or osier for wicker, Middle Irish celach; from caol, slender.
caoimheach
a bedfellow (Sh.), Irish caoimhthech, Early Irish com-aithech, neighbour; see aitheach. Also caomhach, friend, bedfellow. The latter seems from, or influenced by, caomh.
caoimhneas
kindness. This word is supposed by folk etymology to be from caomh, kind, whereas it is really allied to Old Irish coibnes, affionitas, *co-ven-estu-, root ven of fine, q.v.
caoin
kind, mild, so Irish, Old Irish cin, kind, beautiful Welsh cain?: *koini-, root koi, kei of caomh, q.v. Stokes gives base as kaini-, and Bezzenberger compares Greek @Gkanusqai, excel, Church Slavonic sina@?ti, gleam forth. If the base idea were "beauty", English shine might be compared.
caoin
the exterior surface of cloth, right side, rind, sward; from caoin, gentle, polished?
caoin
weep, so Irish, Old Irish cinim, cinim, Old Welsh cuinhaunt, deflebunt, Breton couen, queiniff, *koiniô; qein, qîn; English whine, Norse hvna, whirr; Greek @Gkinurs, wailing. See caoidh.
caoinich
dry, make dry (as hay by the sun), caoin, seasoned; from the adj. caoin?
caoir
a blaze, stream of sparks, a coal, Irish caor, Early Irish cer, *kairo, English hoar (*kairo-), Teutonic root hai in Norse heið, atmospheric clearness, Old High German hei, heat, English heat; Sanskrit kêtus, light. More near are Greek @Gkris (lamp, Hes.), Sanskrit kirn@.a, a ray, clear, has been also suggested. caoran, a peat ember.
caoirean
a plaintive song; also caoi-rn, moaning (H.S.D.). The root word is caoidh; possibly rn, roar, forms the latter part.
caoirnean
a drop of sheep or goats' dung, a drop or globule; cf. Irish caoirn, a little berry, little sheep, from caor, berry, caora, sheep. The two ideas seem confused in Gaelic. In Argyle, gaoirnean; (Arg. ao here is northern ao). From skar, sharn?
caol
slender, so Irish, Old Irish cil, Welsh, Cornish cul, Old Breton culed, macies, *koilo-; Lettic kils, naked; Latin caelebs, single? Greek @Gko@nilos, hollow? Hence caol; caolas, a firth or Kyle.
caolan
gut, intesting, Irish caoln, Early Irish coeln, Old Welsh coilion, exta; from caol.
caomh
tender, kind, so Irish, Early Irish coem, Old Irish cim, Welsh cu, Old Welsh cum, Breton cuff, cun, debonnaire, *koimo-, root kei, lie; Greek @Gkoimw, put to rest, @Gke@nimai, lie; Gothic hims, a village, Anglo-Saxon hm. English home. The idea is "restful".
caomhach
bedfellow, friend, Irish caomthach, friend; See caoimheach, and cf. Irish caomhaighim, I protect, cherish, from caomh.
caomhain
spare, save, caomhnadh, sparing, Irish caoimhnaim, preserve, keep, protect, caomhaighim, caomhnuighim, preserve. The last form seems the most original, if we refer the root to Old Irish anich, protegit, aingim, I protect (a-nak), root nak and nank, as in adhlac, thig, etc. The form nak is more particularly allied to Sanskrit nçati, reach, Lithuanian nesz, draw. The Gaelic verb may have been *com-anich-. It is possible to derive it from caomh with caomhuin as an inf. form which usurped the place of the present stem.
caonnag
strife, tumult, Irish caonng, strife, a next of wild bees: *cais-no-, root kais, kai, heat, English heat, Gaelic caoir?
caor
berry of the rowan, a mountain berry, Irish caor, Old Irish cer, bacca, Welsh cair, berries, ceirion, berry *kairâ. It is seemingly the same word as caoir, blaze, the idea arising probably from the red rowan berries.
caora
a sheep, Irish caora, g. caorach, Old Irish câer, *cairax, from *ka(p)erax, alliet to Latin caper, a goat, Greek @Gkpros, a boar, English heifer. Cf. Welsh caeriwrch, roebuck.
caorrunn
the rowan tree, Irish caorthann, Early Irish caerthann, Welsh cerddin, Breton kerzin, *cairo-tann, from caor, berry, and *tann, tree, Breton tann, oak, Cornish glas-tannen. The connection with Old High German tanna, fir, oak, Middle High German tan, wood, German tanne, fir, English tan, tanner (Greek @Gqmnos, bush?) is doubtful; it would necessitate the idea of borrowing, or that the Celtic word was dann. Ogam Maqui Cairatini, McCaorthainn. Rhys says Welsh is borrowed from Gadelic (C.F.L. 292).
cpa
a capl from the English cap.
cpraid
drunken riotousness (Dial.); from Latin *crâpula.
capull
a horse, mare (more commonly), so Irish, Early Irish capall, Breton caval; from Latin capallus, whence English cavalry, etc., caple (Middle English capil, from Celt.) Norse kapall, nag, seems borrowed from Gaelic. The Welsh is ceffyl, with remarkable vocalisation. capal-coille?
car
turn, twist, Irish cor, Middle Irish cor (= cuairt, ( O'Cl.)), Old Irish curu, gyros, Welsh cor-wynt, turbo, Middle Breton coruent, *kuro-; Latin curvus; Greek @Gkurts, curved. See cruinn.
cr
friendly, related to, Irish cra(d), a friend. See caraid for the usual root.
cradh
condition, usage; from cirich, mend.
caraich
move, stir, Irish corruighim, from corrach, unsteady. The Gaelic confuses this with car, turn.
caraid
a friend, so Irish, Old Irish cara, g. carat, *karant-; Old Irish verb carim, caraim, I love, Welsh caraf, amo, Breton quaret, amare, Gaulish carantus, Caractacus, etc.; Latin cârus, dear, English charity, etc.; Gothic hôrs, meretrix.
craid
a pair, couple, Irish craid, Early Irish crait:
carainnean
refuse of threshed barley, Irish carra, bran; See carthuinnich.
caraist
catechism; from Scottish carritch, a corruption of catechise.
caramasg
contest, confusion ( Arms. M`F.): from car and measg?
caramh
beside; See caruibh.
cramh, cradh
condition, treatment:
carathaist
compulsory labour, cairiste, cairbhist.
carbad
a chariot, so Irish, Old Irish carpat, Welsh cerbyd, Old Breton cerpit, Gaulish carpentoracte, Carbantia, *karbanto-; Latin corbis, a basket; Norse hrip, pannier for peats on horse-back. Latin carpentum (English carpenter, etc.), seems borrowed from Gaulish. The root idea is "wicker", referring to the basket character of the body of these chariots.
carbad
jaw, jaw-bone, so Irish, Welsh car yr ên (car of the mouth), Breton karvan. The idea is "mouth chariot", from the resemblance between the lower jaw and the old wicker chariots. Loth cfs. Welsh carfan, beam, rail, row.
carbh
engrave, carve; from the English.
carbh
a particular kind of ship or boat (Islay); from Norse karfi, a galley for the fiords.
carbhaidh
carraway-seed; from the English.
carbhanach
a carp, Irish carbhn, Manx, caroo; from Norse karfi, English carp.
carcair
a prison, sewer in a cow-house, Irish carcar, prison, Early Irish carcair (do.); from Latin carcer, prison, barrier. cacair in Glenmoriston.
carcais
a carcase; from the English.
ca'rd
card wool, Irish cardaighim; from the English card.
cargo
a cargo, load; from the English.
Carghus
Lent, torment, Irish Corghas, Middle Irish corgus, Welsh garawys; from Latin quadragessima.
crlg
a lock of wool (Sh., H.S.D.), carla, a wool-card (Sh. Coneys for Irish); *card-la-, from card of English For phonetics, cf. irleach.
crlas
excellence, Irish carlamh, excellent, *co-er-lam-, erlam, clever, *air-lam? For lam, See ullamh.
crn
heap of stones, cairn, Irish carn, Early Irish, Welsh carn, Breton karn, *kar-no-, root kar, be hard; Greek @Gkranas, rock ( @Gkra-, @Gkar); further English hard, harsh. See carraig.
crn
a horning. The Gaelic seems a confusion between crn, horn, English horn, put to the horn, and crn. M`F. gives ir chrn for "outlawed", crn-eaglais, excommunication.
crn
a sledge, cart, peat cart, Irish carr, dray, waggon, Early Irish carr, biga, Welsh carr, biga, Old Breton carr, vehiculum (gl.), Gaulish chariot, career, carry, cargo, charge); from Celt. karso-; Latin currus (quors-), from qr@.s; English horse, hurry.
carnaid
red; from English carnation.
crnag
(1) a she-terrier, (2) a small fish found in stony shores at ebb-tide. The first meaning from crn, cairn. Terriers were used for cairn hunting.
carr
the flesh of the seal and whale (Heb.; Carmichael); founded on obsolete carn, flesh?
crr
the itch, mange, superficial roughness, Irish carr; carrach, scabby, Middle Irish carrach, *karsâko-, from kars, be rough, hard; (*kors-ta-); further root kar, to be hard, rough. For crr, rocky shelf, Irish carr, rock, See carraig.
carrachan
a frog-fish, called "cobler", Irish carrachn, the rock fish called cobler (Coneys). From carr, a rock. Also the word means "the wild liquorice root" - carra-meille, q.v.
carragh
a pillar stone, Irish carrthadh, cartha, Early Irish corthe. The root, despite the vocalic difficulty caused by the Early Irish form, is likely the same as in carraig; yet cf. kor of cuir, set.
carraid
conflict; from the root kars in crr, "rough-work"?
carraig
rock, so Irish, Old Irish carric, Welsh careg, Old Welsh carrecc, Breton karrek, *karsekki- (so Rhys, R.C.@+17 102, who thinks Welsh borrowed), from root kars, hard, rough; Norwegian, herren, hard, stiff, harren, hard, English harsh, hard (root kar). See crr.
carra-meille
wild liquorice, wood pease, Irish carra-mhilis. The name is explained as "knots of honey", the carra being the same as crr, and meille the gen. of mil. Hence Scottish carmele, etc.
carran
spurrey, spergula arvensis, Irish carrn, scurvy grass. From the root kars of crr. carran also means a "shrimp", and is of the same origin.
carran-creige
the conger; See carran above.
carrasan
hoarseness, wheezing, Irish carsn; from the root kars, be rough. See crr. Cf. @Gkrnza, catarrh, rotz.
crt
a quart, Irish crt; from the English quart, Latin quartus.
cartan
a small brown insect that eats into the flesh, Irish cartn, a small brown insect that eats into the flesh, a crab. A Gadelicised form of partan, q.v.
carthannach
affectionate, charitable, Irish carthannach; from Latin caritas.
carthuinnich
dwell apart as in a cave, separate (M`F.). Cf. caruinnean, refuse of threshed corn, caruinnich, winnow. Possibly from the root kar, separate, a form of the root of sgar, q.v.
caruibh, an caruibh
beside, near. This is the dat.pl. of car.
cas
foot, leg, Irish cos, Old Irish coss, Welsh coes, *koksâ; Latin coxa, hip; Middle High German hahse, bend of the knee; Sanskrit kkshas, armpit.
cas
steep, sudden, Irish casach, an ascent, Middle Irish cass, rapid, *kasto-; English haste.
cas
curled, Irish, Middle Irish cas, curly, casaim, flecto; &qasto-, root qas; Norse haddr (has-da-), hair, English hair; Lithuanian kasa, hair-plait, Church Slavonic kosa, hair (Kluge). Stokes compares it with Latin quasillum, a basket, root quas.
cas
gnash the teeth, Irish cais, hate, Welsh câs, hate, Breton cas, *cad-s-to-; English hate, German hass, Gothic hatis. Of the same ultimate origin as cas, sudden (Strachan).
cas
fire (as a stone) (Suth.), seemingly founded on English cast. Cf. casadh ar a chile = met (Irish).
cs
a difficulty, Irish cs; from Latin casus (English case).
casach
fishing tackle (part attached to hook): from cas.
casad, casad
a cough, Irish casachdach, Welsh pâs, peswch, Breton pas, *qasto-; English host, Anglo-Saxon hvsta, German husten; Lithuanian ksiu; Sanskrit kâsate, coughs.
casag
cassock, Irish casg; from the English The Early Irish word is casal, from Latin casula.
casaid
a complaint, accusation, Irish casoid, Old Irish cossit. The word is a compound, beginning with con, and seemingly of the same origin as faosaid, q.v. Stokes thinks that the word is borrowed from the Latin causatio; this is not likely, however. Root sen, Welsh cynhenn, quarrel.
casair
sea drift, Irish casair, a shower, Early Irish casair, hail, Welsh cesair (do.), Breton kazerc'h (do.), *kassri-, *kad-tri-; from root cad as in Latin cado, fall. The Irish and Gaelic (?) casir, phosphorescence, seems to be the same word.
casan
a path, Irish casn; from cas, foot.
casan
a rafter, roof-tree; from cas?
casgair
slay, butcher, so Irish, Old Irish coscar, victory, destruction; *co-scar; See sgar.
casnaid
chips of wood (Arms.), Irish casnaidh; *co-+ snaidh, q.v.
caspanach
parallel (Sh.), Irish cospanach (O'R.); *co-spann; See spann.
castan
a chestnut; from Latin castanea, through Middle English castane, chestnut.
castaran
a measure for butter (quarter stone); from the English castor.
castreaghainn
the straw on a kiln below the grain (Arms., not H.S.D.):
cat
a cat, so Irish, Early Irish catt, Welsh cath, Cornish kat, Breton kaz, Gaulish Cattos; Latin catta, perhaps also catulus; English cat, German katze, etc. It is a word of doubtful origin; possibly, however, Celtic, and applied first to the wild cat, then to the tame Egyptian cat introduced in the early centuries of the Christian era.
cata, cta
sheep-cot, pen; from English cot.
catadh, catachadh
taming, ctadh (M`F.); cf. tataich.
catag
potatoe cellar (Dialectic); See cata.
catas
refuse at carding of wool, Irish cads, cotton, scraping of linen rags; from English caddis. See further under caiteas.
cath
battle, Irish, Old Irish cath, Welsh cad, Old Welsh cat, Cornish cas, Gaulish catu-; Old High German hadu-, fight, Anglo-Saxon heaðo-, German hader, contention; Sanskrit çatru, enemy; Greek @Gktos, wrath.
cth
chaff, husks of corn, Irish, Old Irish cith, Welsh codem, a bag, husk, pod (?), *kûti-, root kât, kat, as in caith, spend, cast.
cathachadh
provoking, accusing, fighting, Irish cathaighim; from cath, fight.
cathadh
snow-drift, Irish cthadh, snow-drift, sea-drift; cf. Middle Irish ca, gen. cadh, Welsh cawod, Old Cornish cowes, nimbus, Breton kaouad, *kavat (Stokes); allied to English shower. It is possible to refer the Gaelic word to the root of caith, cth.
cathair
a city, Irish, Early Irish cathair, Old Irish cathir *kastrex, Welsh caer, Breton kaer, *kastro-; Latin castrum, fort (Stokes). The root seems to be cat, cats; the phonetics are the same as in piuthar, for the final part of the word.
cathair
a chair, Irish cathaoir, Early Irish cathir, Welsh cadair, Breton kador; from Latin cathedra, whence also, through Greek, English chair.
cathan
a wild goose with black bill (Heb.); See cadhan.
cathan-aodaich
a web (M`D.):
cthar
mossy ground; See cir.
cathlunn
a corn (Sh.; not in H.S.D.); formed on Latin callum. See calum.
catluibh
cudwort; See cadh-luibh.
c, cath
cream, Middle Irish ce, milk; cf. Breton koavenn, which suggests a form keivo- (cf. gl from gleivo-), root kei, skei, shade, cover, as in Greek @Gski, shadow, German schemen (do.)? The Breton koavenn has been refered to *co+hufen, Welsh hufen, cream. Cf. ce, mist, "covering".
c
the earth, used only in the phrase an cruinne c, the (round) earth, Irish, Early Irish c, for bith ch, on this earth. The c is supposed to be for "this", from the pronomial kei, Greek @Gkei@nnos, he, Latin ce, cis, English he. The root kei, go, move (Latin cio, Greek @Gkw), has also been suggested.
c
give?
c
spouse (Carm.), Irish c:
ceaba, ceibe
the iron part of a spade or other delving instrument; See caibe.
cabhar
a fine breeze (Heb.):
ceabhar
(Carm.), sky, (Prov.) ci'ar:
ceach
an interjection of dislike; See ceacharra.
ceacharra
dirty, mean, obstreperous (Carm.), Irish ceachair, dirt, Middle Irish cecharda, *kekari-; from kek, the e form of the root kak seen in cac, q.v.
ceachladh
digging, Irish ceachlaim, Old Irish ro-cechladatar, suffoderunt, *ce-clad-, a reduplicated or perfect form of the root clad of Gaelic cladh, q.v.
cead
permission, so Irish, Old Irish cet, *ces-do-; Latin ce@-do, I yield (for ces-dô).
ceadan
bunch of wool, Irish ceadach, cloth, coarse cloth, Welsh cadach, clout. Rhys regards Welsh as borrowed from Irish For all, cf. cadadh, caiteas.
ceadha
the part of the plough on which the share is fixed. Also ceidhe. Both words are used for English quay.
ceafan
a frivolous person (Dialectic):
ceird
a trade, Early Irish cerd; See cerd.
ceal
stupor, forgetfulness, Irish ceal, forgetfulness; from the root qel of ceil, conceal. Cf. Early Irish cel, death. ceal, end ( Carm.).
++ceal
same, similar hue (Carm.):
cealaich
the fire-place of a kiln:
cealaich
eat (Kirk), Irish cealaim; root qel as in Latin colo?
cealair
a virago (Badenoch):
cealg
guile, treachery, so Irish, Early Irish celg, *kelgâ; Armenian ke??ch??, hypocrisy. The further root is qel of ceil.
ceall
g. cille, a church, so Irish, Early Irish cell; from Latin cella, a cell, a hermit's cell especially, whence the Gadelic use. Hence cealloir, superior of a cell, and the name Mackellar. "A retired spot" (Hend.).
cealtar
broad-cloth, Irish cealtair, clothes, Early Irish celtar, celt, raiment; from qel, cover, as in ceil, q.v.
ceana
whither, for c'iona, c'ionadh? Cf. Irish c h-ionad. See ionadh.
ceanalta
mild, kind, so Irish; from *cen, as in cion, ++cean, love, desire. See cion.
ceangal
a tie, binding, so Irish, Early Irish cengal, Welsh cengl; from Latin cingulum, vb. cingo, I bind, English cincture.
ceann
head, so Irish, Old Irish cend, cenn, Welsh, Breton penn, Gaul, Penno-, *qenno. Perhaps for qen-no-, root qen (labialised), begin, Church Slavonic koni, beginning, as in ceud, first. The difficulty is that the other labialising languages and the Britonic branch otherwise show no trace of labialisation for qen. Windisch, followed by Brugmann, suggested a stem kvindo-, Indo-European root kvi, Sanskrit çvi, swell, Greek @GPndos, Pindus Mount; but the root vowel is not i, even granting the possible labialisation of kvi, which does not really take place in Greek. Hence ceannag, a bottle of hay, ceannaich, buy (="heading" or reckoning by the head; cf. Dial. ceann, sum up), ceannaich, head-wind ( Hend.), ceannas, vaunting ( Hend.).
ceannach
a purchasing, so Irish, Early Irish cennaigim, I buy, Old Irish cennige, lixa, caingen, negotium.
ceannairc
rebellion, turbulence, so Irish; *ceann+arc; for root arc, See adharc. For meaning cf. English headstrong, Welsh penffest (do.).
ceannard
commander, chief, Irish ceannrd, arrogant, commanding, "high-headed", from ceann and rd; Middle kinnoort, Irish ceannphort, commander, authority, head post or city: ceann+ port.
ceannrach, ceannraig
(Cam.), a brindle or horse's head-gear, Irish ceannrach; from ceann+ rach. For rach (root rig), See cuibhreach, rachas.
ceannsaich
subdue, tame, Irish ceannsaighim; from ceannas, superiority, "head-ness", from ceann and the abst. termination as. Similarly ceannsal, rule.
ceap
a block, shoemaker's last, so Irish, Early Irish cepp, Welsh cyff, Breton kef; from Latin cippus.
ceap
catch, stop. This word seems borrowed from the Scottish kep, of like meaning, a bye-form of English keep. The Irish ceap, bound, bind, stop (?), seems from ceap above.
++ceapach
a tillage plot, Irish ceapach. This Stokes refers to a Celtic keppo-, garden, root kep, ka@-, Latin campus, Greek @Gke@npos, garden, German hube, piece of land. Satisfactory though the meaning be, the derivation is doubtful as involving the preservation of p, even though flanked by a second p (or -n, i.e. kep-n-, which is still more doubtful). Hence the common place name .
ceapag
a verse, an impromptu verse, carelessly sung verse, Early Irish cepc, a chorus song: a rare word in Irish, and said to be Scottish Gaelic for Irish aidbsi, great chorus. From ceap, catch? cf. English catch, a chorus verse. Zimmer suggests that it stands Ce Pc, "kiss here", (?) sung by the girls as a refrain at gatherings!
ceapaire
bread covered with butter, etc. Irish ceapaire; from ceap, a block. Cf. ceapag, a wheel-barrow wheel.
cearb
piece, article of clothing, so Irish, Early Irish cerp, cutting, cerbaim; *kr@.bh, skr@.bh; Greek @Gkrfos, twig, English shrub; *(s)ker, cut, divide. Cf. Welsh carp, rag, cerpyn. Bezzenberger cfs. Middle High German herb, asper. St. now skerb, English sharp.
cearc
a hen, so Irish, Middle Irish cerc, *cercâ; from Indo-European qerqo, to sound, hence "a noise-making bird"; Greek @Gkrkos, a cock, @Gkrx, a fowl; Latin querquedula, a teal, Old Prus. kerko, a diver; Sanskrit kr@.ka-vâkus, a cock.
cearcall
a hoop, so Irish; from Late Latin circulus, circullus, a hoop, from circulus, a circle.
cerd
a craftsman, Irish card, Early Irish cerd, Welsh cerdd, art; Latin cerdo, craftsman; Greek @Gkrdos, gain.
cerdach
a smithy, Irish cardcha, Old Irish cerddchae; from cerd+cae, the latter word cae meaning a house in Irish, a Celtic kaio-n, allied to English home.
ceard-dubhan
scarabæbus, dung-beetle, hornet (H.S.D. for form), ceardaman (M`A.); See cearnabhan. cearr-dubhan ( Carm.), "wrong-sided little black one".
cearmanta
tidy (Arms.); cearmanaich, make tidy (Perth):


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