MacBain's Dictionary - Section 34

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sguab
a broom or besom, Irish sguab, Early Irish scap, Old Irish scptha, scopata, Welsh ysgub, Breton skuba; from Latin scôpa.
sguaigeis
coquetry; cf. guag.
sguainseach
hussy, hoyden (Arg.); possibly from Scottish quean: *-quean-seach; cf. sirsach.
sguan
slur, scandal (Carm.):
sguch
sprain, strain a joint: "spring"; cf. Early Irish scuchim, I depart, root skak, Lithuanian szkti, jump, spring (see sgeun).
sgud
lop, snatch; cf. Welsh ysgûth, scud, whisk, English scud, Scottish scoot, squirt, etc. Gaelic is borrowed.
sgd
a cluster:
sgd
a scout; from the English
sgudal
fish-guts, offal; cf. cut.
sguga
coarse clumsy person, sgugach, a soft boorish fellow; See guga.
sguidilear
a scullion; from the Scottish scudler, scudle, cleanse.
sguids
thrash, dress flax, Irish sguitsim; from English scutch.
sgillear
rakish person (Glenmoriston):
sguir
cease, stop, Irish sguirim, Old Irish scorim, desist, unyoke: *skoriô, root sker, skor, separate; See sgar.
sgird , sgirt
the lap, a smock, apron, Irish sguird; from English skirt, Norse skirta, a shirt.
sguit
the foot board in a boat:
sguit
a wanderer (scute, Shaw): Macpherson's scuta, whence he derives Scotti - an invention of his own?
sglan
a large wicker basket; from Scandinavian - Norse skjla, a bucket, Scottish skeil, tub, skull, shallow basket of oval form. In Sutherland, sgulag means "a basket for holding the linen".
sgulanach
flippant, evil tongued (Carm.):
sgm
scum, foam; from Norse skm, foam, Middle English scu@-m, now scum, German schaum, foam.
sgman
a skirt, tawdry head-dress, corn rick; from sgm, "skimmer"? sguman (Arran).
sgumrag
a fire-shovel, a Cinderella:
sgr
scour, Irish sgraim; from the English.
sgrr
sharp hill; Heb. for sgorr.
s
she, Irish, Old Irish s; See i.
sia
six, Irish s; See s.
siab
wipe, sweep along, puff away, Irish sobadh, blowing into drifts; *sveibbo-, root wveib, English sweep; Norse sveipr, sweep, English sweep. Also siabh, Hence siaban, sand drift, sea-spray.
siabh
a dish of stewed periwinkles (Heb.):
siabhas
idle ceremony:
siabhrach
a fairy, sobhrag (Arran), siobhrag (Shaw), sbhreach (M`A.), Irish siabhra, Early Irish siabrae, siabur, fairy, ghost, Welsh hwyfar in Gwenhwyfar, Guinevere (?): *seibro-:
siabunn , sopunn
soap, Irish siabhainn (fol.), Welsh sebon; from Latin sapo(n), from Teutonic saipô, whence English soap, German seife, Norse spa.
siach
sprain, strain a joint:
siachair
a pithless wretch; another form of sochair.
siad
a stink: *seiddo-, blow; See sid. Cf. English shite.
siad
sloth, Irish siadhail, sloth:
sian
a scream, soft music (Carm.), Irish sian, voice, shout, sound, Early Irish sian: *svêno-, which Stokes (Zeit.@+28 59) explains as *sesveno-, root sven, sound (see seinn).
sian
a pile of grass, beard of barley, Irish, Early Irish sion, foxglove, Welsh ffion, digitalis, ffuon, foxglove, Old Welsh fionou, roses, Breton foeonnenn, privet. Stokes gives the Celtic as *(p)êâno-. Gadelic might be allied to Latin spîna, thorn.
sian
a charm; See seun.
sian
storm, rain, Irish son, weather, season, storm, Old Irish sn, tempestas, Welsh hin, weather, Middle Breton hynon, fair weather: *sênâ; root (sêi) as in sn, sor; Norse seinn, slow, late, Middle High German seine, slowly, English sith, since.
sianan , breac-shianain
freckles; from sian, foxglove? See seunan.
siar
westward, aside, Irish siar, Old Irish sar; from s-iar, See iar, west, and s- under suas.
siaranachadh
languishing, siarachd, melancholy (Dial.); from siar, "going backwards"?
siasnadh
wasting, dwining (Suth.):
siatag
rheumatism; from Latin sciatica.
sibh
you, ye, Irish sibh, Old Irish sib, si, Welsh chwi, Old Welsh hui, Cornish why, Breton c'houi: *sves, for s-ves (Brug.; Stokes has *svês); Greek @Gsfw@nï, you two, Gothic izvis (iz-vis); the ves is allied to Latin vos. The form sibh is for *svi-svi.
sic
the prominence of the belly ( H.S.D.), peritoneum ( M`A.):
sicear
particle, grain (Carm.):
sicir
wise, steady; from Scottish sicker, Middle English siker, from Latin securus, now English sure. Welsh sicr is from Middle English
sd
weather, peasceful weather after storm, tide: *sizdi-, "settling", root sed, sit? Irish has sde in the sense of "blast", from sid. Also td, which suggests borrowing from Norse , tide, time, English tide.
sil
drop, distil, Irish silim, perf. siblais, stillavit, Breton sila, passez: *sviliô. Stokes gives the root as stil, Latin stillo, drop, Greek @Gstlc (do.). Hence silt, a drop. Cf. English spill; *spild, destroy, spoil.
sile
spittle, saliva, Irish seile, Old Irish saile, Welsh haliw, Breton hal, halo: *salivâ (Stokes); Latin saliva. Stokes says that they appear to be borrowed from Latin, while Wharton thinks the Latin is borrowed from Gaulish.
sliche
a lean, pithless creature: "seedy", from sol?
simid
a mallet, beetle, Irish siomaide:
similear
a chimney, Irish seimileur, simnear, simne; from English, Scottish chimley, English chimney.
simleag
a silly woman; from silpidh.
silpidh
simple, Irish simplidhe, silly, simple; from Latin simplex, whence English simple, Welsh syml.
sin
that, Irish, Old Irish sin, Old Welsh hinn, Welsh hyn, hwn, hon, Cornish hen, hon (fem.), Breton hen, Gaulish sosin (= so-sin); from root so (sjo), as in -sa, so, q.v.
sn
stretch, Irish, Old Irish snim: *sêno-, root , mittere, let go; Latin sino, situs; Greek @Gi@`cmi, send. Cf. sr (from *sêro-, long). Allied is root sêi, sei, si, mittere, Norse sðr, long, seinn, slow, Lithuanian seinyti, reach.
sine
a teat, Irish, Early Irish sine, triphne, tree-teated: *svenio- for *spenio-, root spen of Lithuanian spe@?ny/s, udder teat, Old Prussian spenis, teat, Norse speni, teat, Dutch speen, udder, Scottish spain, wean.
sineubhar
gin, juniper tree (Suth.); French geniêvre.
sinn
we, us, Irish sinn, Early Irish sinn, sinne, Old Irish ni, sni, snisni, sninni, Welsh ni, nyni, Cornish ny, nyni, Breton ni: *nes (Brug.; Stokes gives nês), accusative form, allied to Latin nôs, Sanskrit nas, Greek @Gnw/. The s of sni is due to analogy with the s of sibh, or else prothetic (cf. is-s, he is).
sinnsear
ancestors, Irish sinnsear, ancestors, an elder person, Early Irish sinser, elder, ancestor: *senistero-, a double comparative form (like Latin minister, magister) from sean, old, q.v.
snte
plough traces, from sn.
snteag
a skip, pace; from sn.
sob
drift as snow (M`A.); See siab.
siobag
a blast of the mouth, puff, Irish siobg; cf. siab.
soban
foam on crest of waves; See siaban.
sobail
fish, angle (M`A.), soblach, fishing:
siobhag
a straw, candle wick:
sioblach
a long streamer, long person (M`A.); from siab?
sobhalta
civil, peaceful, Irish sibhealta, from Irish sothamhuil, peaceable, Early Irish sdamail. Borrowing from English civil has been suggested (Celt.Mag.@+12 169).
sochaint
peace, Irish sochin, peace, sothchnta, peaceful, sodhchan, atonement, Middle Irish sdchanta, peaceful; from sth.
sochair
a dwarf, fairy, Middle Irish sidhcaire, fairy host, sthcuiraibh (dat.pl.), Early Irish sthchaire; from sth, fairy, and cuire, host (German heer, army, English herald).
soda
silk, Irish soda, Early Irish sta, Welsh sidan; from Late Latin sêta, silk from Latin sêta, a bristle, hair; whence Anglo-Saxon sde, silk, English satin.
sogach
pale, ill-coloured, Irish sogach, streaked, ill-coloured, sog, a streak, a shock of corn:
siogach
greasy ( M`A.), lazy ( M`F.):
siogaid
a starveling, lean person; from Latin siccus?
sol
seed, Irish sol, Old Irish sl, semen, Welsh hil: *sêlo-n, root , sow; Latin sêmen; English seed, German saat; Lithuanian pa-se@?ly/s, a sowing.
siola
a gill; from the English
siola
a wooden collar for a plough horse; from Scandinavian - Swed. sela, a wooden collar, Norse seli, harness, sili, a strap, Scottish sele, a wooden collar to tie cattle to the stalls.
siola
a syllable, Irish siolla, Early Irish sillab; from Latin syllaba, whence English syllable.
soladh
straining, filtering, Irish solthughadh, Early Irish sithlad, Welsh hidlo, hidl, a filter; also Old Irish sthal = Latin situla, a bucket; from Latin situla (Stokes Lismre). Gaelic soladh, also means "sibsiding", and leans for its meaning, if not its origin, upon sth, peace.
solag
a sand-eel:
siolc
snatch, pilfer:
siolgach
lazy, swarfish:
sioll
a tun, rotation (M`A.), Welsh chwyl; See seal. Cf. Irish siolla, whiff, glint, syllable; root of seal.
solta
a teal, small wild duck; from English teal?
soman
a rop of straw or hay; from the Norse sima, g.pl. smna, a rope, cord, Scottish simmonds, heather ropes (Orkneyu), Teutonic *sîmon-, Anglo-Saxon sma, fetter, Shet. simmen; Greek @Gi@`mona ( i long), well rope; Indo-European sîmon-, a bond, band, seio-, bind.
siomlach
see seamlach.
son
something, anything; also "weather", for sian, whence possibly this meaning of "anything" comes.
sionadh
lord (M`Pherson's Fingal@+1, 341): if genuine, the root may be sen, old; cf. Latin senior, now English sir.
sionn
phosphorescent, solus sionn, phosphorus, also teine-sionnachain. For root See sionnach.
sionnach
valve of bellows, pipe-reed, pob-shionnaich, Irish bagpipe. From root spend, swing, play, Sanskrit spand, move quickly. Greek @Gsfednc, sling, Latin pendeo, hang, English pendulum.
sionnach
a fox, so Irish, Early Irish sinnach, sindach, Old Irish sinnchenae, vulpecula:
sionnsar
bagpip chanter, Irish siunsoir; from the English chanter.
siop
despise; cuir an siop, turn tail on (Hend.); See sap.
sopunn
soap; See siabunn.
sor
long, continual, Irish sor, Old Irish sr, comparative sa, Welsh hir, compar. hwy, Cornish, Breton hir: *sêro-s; Latin sêrus, late, French soir, evening, English soiree; Sanskrit sây, evening. See sian, sn.
siorra
( M`A., M`E.), siorraimh, siorram ( H.S.D.), a sheriff, siorrachd, siorramachd, county, Irish sirriamh, Middle Irish sirriam; from Middle English shirreve, now sheriff, "shire-reeve". The Scottish is shirra usually.
siorradh
a deviation, onset: *sith-rad, from sith?
sorruidh
eternal, Irish sorruidhe; from *sr-rad, eternity, sor.
sos
down, Irish sos, Old Irish ss: *s-s, from s- (see suas) and s, or ++os, q.v.
siosar
a scissors, Irish siosur; from the English
siota
a blackguard, a pet; from Scottish shit.
sir
search, Irish sirim (srim, Con.), Early Irish sirim: *s(p)eri-, root sper, foot it; Norse spyrja, ask, track, Scottish spere, ask after, German spüren, trace, track, also further English spur; Latin sperno (English spurn allied), etc. The vowel of sir is short (otherwise Stokes' Dict., Rhys Manx Pray.@+2 71, who compares Welsh chwilio.
siris , sirist
a cherry, Irish siris, Welsh ceirios; from Middle English *cheris, from Old French cerise, Latin cerasus, Greek @Gkrasos.
siteag
a dunghill; from the English Cf. Norse saeti.
sith
a stride, onset, a dart to, Irish sidhe, gust, Middle Irish sith, onset; cf. Irish sith-, intensive prefix (O'Don. Greek 277), *setu-, seti-, may be root es, @Getums (Bez.@+21 123), Early Irish sith, long, Welsh hyd, to, as far as, Old Welsh hit, longitudo, usque ad, Breton hed, length, during: *seti, root , as in sor, long (Stokes). Cf. Norse sðr, long, English sith; root sit.
sth
peace, Irish sth, soth, Early Irish sth, Old Irish sd: *sêdos (neut. s stem), root sed (sêd) of suidhe, q.v.; Latin sêdo, settle; Lithuanian se@?dti, sit. Welsh hedd, peace, is from se@ud.
sth
a fairy, sthich (do.), Irish sdh, a fairy hill, sgh, a fairy, sgheg (do.), Old Irish sde, dei terreni, whose dwelling is called sd; in fact, sde, the fairy powers, is the pl. (ge. s. ?) of sd, fairy dwelling or mound, while its gen. sing. appears in mn sde, fir sde: *sêdos, g. sêdesos, as in the case of sth, peace, which is its homonym (Stokes); root se, sêd, Greek @Ge@`dos, a temple or statue, literally an "abode" or "seat"; Latin noven-sides, noven-siles, the new gods imported to Rome. Thurneysen has compared Latin sîdus, a constellation, "dwelling of the gods". Hence sthean, a green knoll, fairy knoll.
sithionn
venison, Irish sdh, and sdheann (O'R.), Middle Irish sieng, sideng, deer, Welsh hyddgig (= "stag's flesh"), from hydd, stag, red deer: *sedi-, deer; to which is to be referred Middle Irish segh (= agh allaidh, O'Cl.), Early Irish sg (= oss allaidh, Corm.).
sitig
the rafter of a kiln laid across, on which the corn is dried:
sitinn
roller for a boat:
sitir , sitrich
neighing, Irish sitreach: cf. sid, blow (*svid-tri-).
siubhal
walking, so Irish, Middle Irish siubal, for *siumal, Welsh chwyf, motus, chwyfu, move, stir, Middle Breton fifual, now finval, stir; root svem, move; Old High German, Anglo-Saxon swimman, English swim. Cf. Welsh syflyd, move, stir.
siubhla
see luighe-siubhla.
siuc
a word by which horses are called:
siucar
(sicar, H.S.D.), sugar, Irish sicra, Welsh sugr; from Middle English sugre, French sucre.
sidadh
swinging; from Scottish showd, swing, waddle, Old Sax. skuddian, shake, Old Dutch schudden (do.), English shudder.
siug
call to drive away hens; cf. English shoo!
siunas
lovage plant; See sunais.
sup
a tail, appendage; cf. sap.
sirsach
a whore; from the English, with the Gaelic fem. termination -seach (see innseach).
siuthad
say away, begin, go on: *seo-tu, "here you", from so and tu? Cf. trobhad, thugad.
slabhag
pith of a horn: Scottish sluch?
slabhagan
a kind of reddish sea-weed, sloke, Irish slabhacn; from English sloke, Scottish sloke, slake.
slabhcar
a slouching fellow (Suth.), a taunter; from Norse slkr, slouching fellow, whence English slouch.
slabhraidh
a chain, Irish slabhra, Old Irish slabrad: *slab-rad, from slab, root la@g, of Greek @Glambnw, I take, catch, English latch.
slachd
thrash, beat, Irish slacairim; root slag, sleg, or sl@.g, Early Irish sligim, beat, strike, slacc, sword: *slegô, beside Indo-European slak as in Gothic slaha, strike, German schlagen (do.), English slay (Stokes for sligim); further Latin lacerare, lacerate, Greek @Glakzw, tear (Kluge). Hence slachdan, beetle, rod.
slad
theft, Irish slad, Middle Irish slat: *sladdo-. Stokes gives the Celtic as *stlatt-, allied to Latin stlâta (stlatta), pirate ship, and English steal. The modern forms point to Gadelic *sladdo-, for *stl@.-ddo-, allied to English steal?
sladhag
a sheaf of corn ready to be thrashed (H.S.D.):
sladhaigeadh
a kind of custard spread over bread (M`D.):
slag
a hollow (Lewis); Norse slakki, slope, North English hollow.
slib
mire; See lban. Skeat refers English slab, slime, but it is likely native (cf. slop, etc.).
slaid
a minificent gift:
slaightear , slaoightear
a rogue, Irish sloitire, rogue, sloitireachd, roguery, Middle Irish sleteoracht, theft (O'Cl.); from slad (Irish sloit), rob.
slaim
great booty, a heap: from the Scottish slam, a share or possession acquired not rightly, slammach, to seize anything not entirely by fair means, Swed. slama, heap together.
slais
lash; from the English
slam
a lock of hair or wool, Irish slm, Early Irish slamm: *slags-men, Greek @Glhos, wool, @Glhnc, down (otherwise Prellwitz, who refers Greek to *vl@.k-snâ, root vel of olann, q.v.
slaman
curdled milk, Irish slamanna, clots, flakes (O'Cl.), Early Irish slaimred (na fola). Cf. lommen, gulp.
sln
healthy, whole, Irish, Old Irish sln: *sl@-@.-no- (Brug.), *s@?lâno-s (Stokes); Latin salvus (= sl@-@.-vo-, Brug.), safe, solidus, firm English solid; Greek @Go@`los, whole (= @GslFos); English silly, originally meaning "blessed", German selig, blessed; Sanskrit srvas, whole, all. Welsh, Breton holl is referred here by Stokes, etc., more immediately allied to Latin sollus, whole, all.
slaod
drag, trail, Irish slaodaim, draw after, slide, slaod, a raft, float, Early Irish slet, a slide: *sloiddo-, Celtic root sleid, slid; Welsh litthro, English slide, Anglo-Saxon sldan, German schlitten, slide, sledge (n.); Lithuanian slids, smooth, Greek @Go@'liscanw, *slid-d-. Stokes explains the d of slaod as for dd, from -dn-: *slaidh-n-.
slaop
parboil, slaopach, parboiled, slovenly, Irish slaopach, lukewarm (O'R.); also slaopair, a sloven, for which See slapach.
slapach , slpach
slovenly, Irish slapach, slovenly, slapar, a trail or train; from Scandinavian - Norse slpr, a good-for-nothing, slaepa, vestis promissa et laxa (Jamieson), sloppr, English slop, Scottish slaupie, slovenly, Dutch slap, slack, remiss, German schlaff.
slapraich
din, noise; from English slap.
slat
a rod, twig, Irish slat, Middle Irish slat, slatt, Welsh llath, yslath, Breton laz: *slattâ; English lath is from Welsh Middle English latte, Anglo-Saxon laetta, Old High German latta, German latte are also Celtic borrows, French latte (Thurneysen), but Kluge regards them as cognate.
sleabhag
mattock for digging up carrots, etc. (Carm.); sleidheag, kind of ladle (Lewis); cf. Norse sleif.
sleagh
a spear, so Irish, Early Irish sleg: *sl@-@.gâ; Sanskrit sr@.j, hurl, sling.
sleamacair
sly person (Lewis); cf. Norse slaemr, bad.
sleamhan
stye (Carm.):
sleamhuinn
slippery, smooth, Irish sleamhuin, Old Irish slemon, Welsh llyfn, smooth, Old Breton limn (in compounds): *slib-no-s, root slib, sleib; Norse sleipr, slippery, English slip, slippery; Greek @Go@'librs, @Glibrs, slippery. See sliabh also.
sligeil
dilatory, sleugach, drawling, slow, sly; also leug, laziness; from the Scottish sleek?
slisneadh
back-sliding (Heb.): *sleið-s-, root of slaod and English slide?
sleuchd
kneel, Irish slachdain, Old Irish slchtaim; frpom Latin flecto.
sliabh
a moor, mountain, Irish sliabh, mountain, Old Irish slab: *sleibos, root sleib, slib, glide, down, Indo-European slei@go-; English slope, from slip, Norse sleipr, slippery; See sleamhuinn. Welsh llwyf, platform, loft, seems allied to Gaelic sliabh.
sliachdair
spread any soft substance by trampling, daub: *sleikto-, sleig, Norse slkr, smooth, English sleek, German schlick, grease, the original idea being "greasy", like soft mud. Cf. Early Irish sliachtad, smoothing, preening.
sliasaid , sliasad
(sliaisd, Dial.), thigh, Irish sliasad, Old Irish sliassit, poples: a diphthongal form of the root of slis, q.v.
slibist
a sloven; cf. Irish sliobair, drag along; from English slip, sloven.
slige
a scale of a balance, a shell, Irish slige, a grisset, shell, Old Irish slice, lanx, ostrea: *sleggio-, root sleg, for which cf. slachd.
slighe
a way, Irish slighe, Early Irish slige, g. sliged: *sleget-, root sleg of Irish sligim, I. strike (ro sligsetar, ro selgatar rotu, they hewed out ways). See slachd further.
slinn
a weaver's sley or reed, Irish slinn, a sley, Middle Irish slind, pecten, also slige, pecten, which suggests for slinn a stem: *sleg-s-ni-, sleg being the same root as that of slighe and slachd. Cf. English sley allied to slay, smite. Stokes refers both Old Irish slind, tile and weaver's sley, to the root splid, splind, English split, splint. See slinnean and sliseag further.
slinnean
shoulder blade, shoulder, Irish slinnen, Middle Irish slindn: cf. Old Irish slind, imbrex, tile, Irish slinn, slate, tile, also Early Irish slind-gr, smooth-sharp, slate-polished (?), slinnd-glanait, whetstone-cleaned: *slindi-, root slid, sleid, smooth, glide, English slide, Lithuanian slids, smooth. Stokes refers slind, imbrex, to the root splid, splind, split, English split, splint; See sliseag.
slob
stroke, rub, lick, Irish sliobhaim, polish, Middle Irish slipthe, whettened, slibad, whetting, Welsh yslipan, burnish; from Norse or Anglo-Saxon - Norse slpa, whet, make sleek, Anglo-Saxon slpan, slip, glide, Middle L.German slpen, sharpen, Middle Dutch slijpen, polish, sharpen.
sliochd
posterity, tribe, Irish sliochd, Middle Irish slicht, trace, track, Old Irish slict, vestigium: *slektu-, root sleg of slighe and slachd. For similar origin, cf. German geschlecht, race, lineage.
slogach
sly, Irish slogach, sleek, fawning, slgthech, sly; from English, Scottish sleek, Norse slkr, smooth; Indo-European slei@g, glide ( See sliabh).
slom
sleek, slippery, slim, the buttercup (Carm.), Irish slomaim flatter, smooth, gloss over; from English slim, sly, crafty, slender, now "slim", Scottish slim, naughty, slim o'er, gloss over, Old Dutch slim, awry, crafty, German schlimm, bad, cunning. Hence Gaelic slomaire, weakling, craven.
sliop
a lip, blubber lip; from English lip.
slios
the side of a man or beast, flank, Irish slios, Old Irish sliss, pl. slessa, Welsh ystlis: *stlisti-, root stel, extend, Latin stlâtus, lâtus, wide, Church Slavonic stelja, spread.
slis , sliseag
a chip, Irish slis, sliseg, Early Irish sliss: *slissi-, from *splid-s-ti, root splid. English split, splice, splint, German spleissen, etc. English slice has been compared, English slit, root slid, which could also produce the Gadelic forms.
slisneach
a plant like the slan-lus (Carm.):
sloc
a pit, slough, Irish sloc: *slukko-, for *slug-ko-, root slug, swallow, as in slug, q.v. Skeat derives hence Anglo-Saxon slh, English slough. German schlucht, hollow, ravine, is referred by Kluge to the root slup, lubricus.
slod
a puddle, Irish slod; See lod.
slcan
sloke; from the Scottish or English sloke.
sloinn
surname, Irish sloinnim, I. name, Old Irish slondim, name, significo, slond, significatio, Old Welsh islinnit, profatur, Middle Welsh cy-stlwn, family and clan name, Welsh ystlyned, kindred, ystlen, sex: *stlondo-, *stlondiô, I speak, name.
sloisir
dash, beat against sea-like, daub; from Scottish slaister, bedaub, a wet liquid mass, to move clumsily through a miry road, also slestir (Badenoch Dial. sleastair, bedaub).
sluagh
people, Irish sluagh, Old Irish sluag, slg, Welsh llu, Cornish lu, Gaulish slôgi, in Catu-slogi: *slougo-s, cf. Slavonic sluga, a servant, Lithuanian slauginti.
sluaisreadh
act of mixing (lime, etc.) with a shovel; See sluasaid. Cf. English slubber.
sluasaid
a shovel, Irish sluasad, a paddle, a shovel:
slug
swallow, slugadh (inf.), Irish slugaim, Early Irish slucim, slocim: *sluggô, root slug, lug, swallow; German schlucken, to swallow, Middle High German slucken: Greek @Glzw, @Glugganw, have the hiccup. Welsh llwnc, gullet, a gulp, llyncu, to swallow, Old Breton ro-luncas, guturicavit, m.Breton lloncaff are allied to Early Irish longad, now longadh, eating, which is a nasalised form of the root slug, lug.
smachd
authority, correction, Irish smachd, Old Irish smacht, Middle Irish smachtaigim, I enjoin, smacht, fine for breaking the law: *smaktu-, from s-mag, root mag, Indo-European magh, be strong; English may, Gothic magan, be able; Greek @Gmc@nhos, means (see mac).
smad
a particle, jot: "spot, stain" (see smod). From Scottish smad, smot, a stain, English smut. Irish has smadn, soot, smut. Cf. also Middle Irish smot, a scrap, Irish smotn, a block, Welsh ysmot, patch, spot.
smd
threaten, intimidate, boast:
smg, smg
a paw; See smg.
smal
dust, spot, blemish, Irish sml, sml; root smal, mal (smel, mel), Lithuanian smlkas, dust, sme@?lynas, sand field, smelalis, sand, Lettic smelis, water sand, Gothic mlma, sand, Norse melr, sand hill, English mole.
sll
snuff a candle, Irish sml, embers, snuff of candle; cf. smal.
smalag
the young saith or cuddie:
smaoin
think; See smuain.
smarach
a lad, a growing youth (Badenoch); root smar, from mar, mer, Greek @Gmei@nraz, boy, Sanskrit maryaks, a mannie, mryas, young man, Lithuanian marti, bride; also Welsh morwyn, girl, merch, daughter, Breton merc'h. Cf. Aran Irish marlach, child of two to five years, either sex.


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