MacBain's Dictionary - Section 29

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peic
a peck, Irish peic, Welsh pec; from English pec.
peighin
a penny, Irish pighin, Early Irish pingin; from Anglo-Saxon pennding, Norse peningr, now English penny.
peilig
a porpoise; from Scottish pellack.
peileasach
frivolous; cf. Scottish pell, a soft, lazy person.
peileid
cod, husk, bag:
peileid
a slap on the head, the skull or crown of the head; in the last sense, cf. Scottish pallet, crown of the head, Middle English palet, head-piece. In the sense of "slap", cf English pelt.
peileir
a bullet, Irish peileur, L.Middle Irish pelr: from some French descendant of Latin pila, ball, and allied to English pellet, Old French pelote, ball, Sp. pelote, connon ball.
peilister
a quoit, flat stone; formed from the stem peileir?
pellic
a covering of skins or coarse clothe, Irish peillic, a booth whose roof is covered with skins, Early Irish pellec, basket of untanned hide; from Latin pelliceus, made of skins, from pellis.
peineag
a chip of stone for filling crevices in wall; from Scottish pinning, pinn (do.), allied to English pin.
peinnteal
a snare; another form of painntear, q.v.
peirceall
the jaw, lower part of the face, corer, Irish peircioll, cheekblade, corer: *for-ciobhull, "on-jaw"? See ciobhull.
peirigill
deger, Irish peiriacul; from Latin periculum.
pire
the buttocks, Irish pire (O'R.); cf. Cornish pedren, buttock, Welsh pedrain. The word peurs, lente perdere (M`A.), is doubtless connected.
peireid
ferret (M`A.).
piris
testiculi (H.S.D.); apparently from French pierre.
peiteag
waistcoat, short jacket; from Scottish petycot, a sleeveless tunic worn by men, English petticoat. Manx has pettie, flanel waistcoat, peddee, waistcoat.
peithir
a forester (pethaire, M`D.), peithire, a message boy (M`A.); cf. Scottish peddir, a pedlar, English pedlar.
peithir, beithir
thunderbolt; a mythic and metaphoric use of beithir, q.v.
peitseag
a peach; Irish peitseg; from the English
pedar
pewtar, Irish patar, Welsh ffeutar; from English pewter. Also fedar, q.v.
peucag
pea-hen, Irish pêacg, peacock (Fol.); from English peacock.
peur
a pear, Irish piorra, pire ( O'R.), Welsh peran; from Eg. pear.
peurda
flake of wool off the cards in the first carding:
peurdag , piartag
a partridge, Irish pitrisg (Fol.); Gaelic is from Scottish pertrik, a side form of English partridge, Latin perdic-em.
peursair
perchman, shore herd (Carm.):
pian
pain, Irish pan, poena, Welsh poen, pain, Cornish peyn, Breton poan; from Latin poena, English pain.
pibhinn
lapwing; from Scottish peeweip, English peewit. The true Gaelic is adharcan, "horned one" (from adharc, because of the appearance of its head).
pic
pitch, Irish pic, Welsh pyg; from Middle English pik, now pitch.
pc
a pike, Irish pice, Welsh pig, from the English
piceal
pike, Irish picill (Fol.); from the English
pigeadh, pigidh
earthen jar, Irish pign, Welsh picyn; from English, Scottish piggin, pig, which is a metaphoric use of English pig, sow.
pighe, pigheann
a pie, Irish pghe; from the English
pigidh
robin redbreast (H.S.D.); a confused use of English pigeon?
pilig
peel, peeling (Dial.); from the English See piol.
pill
a sheet, cloth, the cloth or skin on which corn is winnowed; a particular use of the oblique form of peall, q.v. Middle Irish pill or pell means "rug".
pill
turn, Irish pillim, better fillim (O'Br.); See till for discussion of the root.
pillean
pack-saddle, pillion, Irish pilln, Welsh pilyn; English pillion is allied, if not borrowed, according to Skeat. All are formed on Latin pellis (see peall). Scottish has pillions for "rags"; Breton pill (do.).
pine
a pin, peg, Irish pionn (Lh.), Welsh pin; from Middle English pinne, now pin.
pinnt
a pint, Irish pint (Fol.); from the English
pob
a pipe, a musical instrument, Irish pob, Early Irish pp, pl. pipai (Lib.Leinster), (music) pipe; from Medieval Latin pîpa, whence Anglo-Saxon pîpe, English pipe, German pfeife, Norse ppa. Welsh, Cornish, and Breton have pib, pipe, similarly borrowed.
piobar
pepper; See peabar.
pobull
The Bible (Dial.): See boball.
pioc
pick, Irish piocaim; from English pick. Thurneysen thinks that Welsh pigo is ultimately from the Romance picco (point), French pique, or allied thereto. Skeat takes the English from Celtic; but See Bradley's Stratmann.
piocach
a saith, coalfish (Wh.):
piocaid
pickaxe, Irish piocid; from pioc, English pick, a pickaxe, from French pic (do.). Whether the termination is Gadelic or the French word piquet, little pickaxe, English picket, was borrwed at once, it is hard to say.
pochan
a wheezing, Manx piaghane, hoarseness, Irish spiochan; Scottish pech, pechin, panting, peught, asthmatic. Onomatopoetic Cf. Latin pipire, chirp, pipe. Welsh has peuo, pant.
pioghaid, pigheid
a magpie, Irish pioghaid ( Fol.), pighead ( O'R.); from Scottish pyat, pyet, diminutive of pie, Middle English pye, now usually mag-pie.
piol
nibble, pluck; from English peel, earlier, pill, pyll, peel, pluck, ultimately from Latin pellis. Also spiol, q.v. Welsh has pilio, peel, strip.
piollach
(1) neat, trim (M`F., H.S.D., Arms.), (2) hairy (= peallach, of which it is a side form, H.S.D., etc.), fretful, curious-looking (M`A.). The second sense belongs to peallach, the first to piol: "pilled".
piollaiste
trouble, vexation: "plucked" state, from piol?
pioraid
hat, cap; See biorraid.
porbhuic , piorrabhuic
periwig, Irish peireabhuic; from the English
piorr
scrape or dig ( H.S.D.), stab, make a lunge at one ( M`A.); the first sense seems from Scottish, English pare; for the second, See purr.
piorradh
a squall, blast; from L.Middle English pirry, whirlwind, blast, Scottish pirr, gentle breeze, Norse byrr, root bir, pir, of onomatopoetic origin (Skeat, sub pirouette, for English).
pos
a piece, Irish posa; from English piece, French pice, Low Latin pettium, from Gaulish *pettium, allied to Gaelic cuit, Pictish pet (see pit).
pos
a cup, Irish posa; from Latin pyxis, box (Stokes).
piostal
a pistol, so Irish; from English
piphenaich
giggling (M`D.):
piseach
prosperity, luck, Manx bishagh, Irish biseach, Middle Irish bisech. Cf. Irish piseg, witchcraft, Middle Irish pisc, charm, Manx pishag, charm, Cornish pystry, witchcraft, Middle Breton pistri, veneficium, which Bugge refers to Latin pyxis, medicine box (see pos).
piseag
a kitten, Irish puisn; from English puss. Aran Irish piseg, See bream.
pit
hollow or pit (Dict. only), @Gksqos, Middle Gaelic pit (Dean of Lismore), Manx pitt, Irish pit; from Anglo-Saxon pyt, pit, well, now pit, from Latin puteus, well. for force, cf. Breton fetan, fountain, fete, @Gksqos. The non-existent Dict. meaning is due to the supposed force of topographic pit discussed in Pit-.
Pit-
prefix in farm and townland names in Pictland, meaning "farm, portion"; Old Gaelic pet, pett, g. pette (Book of Deer), a Pictish word allied to Welsh peth, part, Gaelic cuid. See further under cuid and pos.
pig
a plaintive note (H.S.D.); cf. Welsh puch, sigh. Onomatopoetic?
piuthar
sister, Irish siur, Early Irish siur, fiur, g. sethar, fethar, Old Irish siur, Welsh chwaer, Cornish huir, Breton hoar: *svesôr, g. svestros (Stokes); Latin soror (= sosor); English sister; Lithuanian sesu@; Sanskrit svâsar.
plab
soft noise as of a body falling into water; from Scottish plope, Dial. English plop: onomatopoetic like plump. Skeat compares English blab. See plub.
placaid
a wooden dish; through Scottish (?) from French plaquette, plaque, a plate, whence English placard, Scottish placad. M`A. gives also the meaning "flat, broad, good-natured female", which is a metaphoric use.
plaibean
a lump of raw flesh, a plump boy; founded on Scottish plope, as in plab above. Cf. English plump.
plaide
a blanket, Irish ploid; English plaid, Scottish plaiden, coarse woollen cloth, like flannel, but twilled: all are founded on Latin pellis, but whether invented by Gadelic or English is at present doubtful. Skeat says it is Celtic, a view which, as the case stands, has most to say for it; cf. Gaelic peallaid, sheepskin. Dunbar's "Hieland Pladdis".
pligh
a plague, Irish pligh, Early Irish plg, Welsh pla; from Latin plâga, disaster, Middle English plge, Eg. plague.
plais
a splash; from Scottish plash, to strike water suddenly, English plash, splash.
plam
anything curdled: cf. Breton plommein, a clot, as of blood. See slaman. M`A. gives it the meaning of "fat blubber cheek". Arg. has "bainne plumaichte", curdled or soured mild.
plang
a plack - a Scots coin; from Scottish plack, a copper coin equal to four pennies Scots, which came with the Flemish, etc., and is allied to French plaque, used of coin, though really a "metal dish, etc.". See placaid.
plangaid
a blanket; Irish plainceud (Fol.); from the English
plannta
a plant, Irish planda; from English plant, Latin planta.
plaosg
a husk, shell, Manx pleayse, Irish plaosg, Welsh plisg (pl.), Breton pluskenn. This Ernault considers borrowed from Romance - French peluche, shag, plush, English plush, from Latin *pilucius, hairy, pilus, hair: an unlikely derivation. Seemingly blaosg is another form (Manx bleayst, Middle Irish blaesc, Welsh blisg): *bhloid-sko-, root bhlo@-i, bhle@-, bhel, swell, etc.; Greek @Gflois ( @G*bhlovio-?), bark, shell, @Gfldwn, bladder.
plsd
a plaster, Irish plasdruighim; from the English
plt
a sort of cloth made of straw; from Scottish plat, plait, English plait. M`A. has the meaning "thrust, clap on", from Scottish plat, a stroke to the ground, blow with the fist, Middle English platten, strike, throw down, Anglo-Saxon plaettan.
plath , pladh
a flash, glance, puff of wind; from *svl@.-, root svel of solus?
pleadhag
a dibble, paddle; also bleaghan, spleadhan, q.v.
pleadhart
a buffet, blow; from pailleart?
pleasg
a noise, crack, Irish plasg (pleasg Lh.) - an Irish word (M`A.), Irish pleasgan or plascn, noise: cf. Scottish pleesk, plesk, plash, pleesh-plash, dabbling in water or mud.
pleasg
a string of beads:
pleat
a plait; from Scottish plett, English plait.
pleid
solicitationn; See bleid.
pleigh
quarrel, fight, Irish plidh, debate; Scottish pley, quarrel, debate, all from Middle English pleie, plege, Anglo-Saxon plega, game, fight, English play.
pleoisg, plodhaisg
a booby, simpleton; cf. Welsh bloesg, a stammerer (mlaisqo-), Sanskrit mlecchati, talk barbarously, mleccha, foreigner, Latin blaesus, Greek @Gblaiss.
pledar
pewter; from English spelter, with leaning on pedar.
pliad
(H.S.D., Dial.), a plot of ground; of Scandinavian origin - Swed plaetti, a plot of ground, English plot, plat (Dr Cameron).
pliadach
flat, as of foot (Carm.):
pliadh
a splay foot; from English splay.
pliaram
babbling (H.S.D.); for *bliaram; See blialum, from Scottish blellum.
plionas
a hypocritical smile (Wh.):
pliotair
(pliodaire, M`A.), a fawner, cajoler; cf. Irish pleadail, pleading; from English plead.
pliut
a clumsy foot; cf. Scottish ploots, the feet when bare (Shet.), plootsacks, feet. Hence pliutach, a seal. See spliut.
ploc
a roud mass, clod, block (rare), Irish bloc, a block, Welsh ploc, block, plug, Breton bloc'h, block, mass: Gadelic and Welsh are from English block, from French bloc, of German origin - German block, clod, lump, from the root of English balk.
plod
a clod; from Scottish plod, ploud, a green sod (Aberdeen).
plod
a fleet, Manx plod; from Norse floti, English fleet, float, etc.
plod
a pool of standing water, Manx, Irish plod; from Middle English plodde, a puddle, English plod, originally "to wade through water", ploude, wade through water (Grose), Scottish plout, plouter (do.).
plodadh
parboiling; from Scottish plot, to scald or burn with boiling water, plottie, a rich and pleasant hot dring made of cinnamon, cloves, etc. Also "floating" wood down river.
ploic
the mumps; See pluic.
plosg
palpitate, throb, Irish plosg ( O'R., Fol.), blosgadh, sounding, Early Irish blosc ("ro clos blosc-bimnech a chride", the hitting sound of his heart). See ++blosg.
plub
a plump, sudden fall into water; from English plump. Cf. plab. Hence plubraich, gurgling, plunging; etc.
plub
an unweildy mass or lump; from the English plump.
plubair
a booby, one speaking indistinctly, blubberer; from English blubber.
pluc
a lump, pimple, Manx plucan, pimple; seemingly a side form of ploc. Middle Irish has plucc, club or mace. Cf. Scottish pluke, a pimple.
pluc
pluck, Manx pluck; from the English
plc
beat, thump; from Middle English pluck, a stroke.
plucas
the flux; founded on Latin fluxus?
plch
squeeze, compress, Irish pluchaim, Manx ploogh, suffocation:
pluic
cheek, blub cheek, Irish pluc: "puffed cheek"; from ploc.
pluideach
club-footed; See pliut.
plirean
a flower, Irish plr; from Middle English flour (now flower), Old French flour (now fleur).
plum
plunge into water; See plumb.
plm
one who sits stock still, dead calm:
pluma , plumba
a plummet, Irish plumba; from English plumb, French plomb, from Latin plumbum, lead.
plumb
noise of fallinng into water, plunge; from English plump.
plumbas , plumbais
a plum, Irish pluma; from Middle English ploume, now plum.
plundrainn
plunder, booty; from English plundering.
plr
flour, Irish flr; from Middle English flour; same as English flower, flour being for "flower of wheat".
plutadh
falling down, as of rain; from Scottish plout, Belg. plotsen, German plotzlich, sudden, from *plotz, "quickly falling blow".
pobull
people, Irish pobal, Old Irish popul, Welsh, Breton pobl, Cornish pobel; from Latin populus, whence English people.
poca
a bag; from Scottish pock, Anglo-Saxon poca, Norse, poki, Old French poche.
pca , pcaid
pocket, pouch, Irish pca, pcait (Four Masters), bag, pouch; from Middle English pke, Anglo-Saxon poca, as poca. English pocket, Middle English poket, is a diminutive. K.Meyer takes the Irish from the Norse poki.
pg , pg
a kiss, Manx paag, Irish pg, Old Irish pc, pcnat, osculum, Welsh pc, Breton pok; from Latin pâcem, "the kiss of peace", which was part of the ritual for the Mass; hence in Church Latin dare pacem, means "to give the kiss". The old Celtic liturgies generally carry the rubric "Hic pax datur" immediately before the Communion.
pireagan
rag, rags (M`D.):
poit
a pot, Irish pota, Welsh pot, Breton pod; from English and French pot, from Latin potare ultimately. See pit.
pit
drinking, tippling, Irish pit: from Latin pôtus, drunk (English potation, poison, etc.). See l.
poitean
a small truss of hay or straw; See boitean.
poll
a pool, a hole, mud, Irish, Early Irish poll, Welsh pwll, Cornish pol, Breton poull; from Late Latin padulus, pool, a metathesis of palus, paludis, marsh (Gaidoz), whece It. padula, Sp. pal. Teutonic has Anglo-Saxon pl, English pool, Dutch poel, Old High German pfuol, German pfuhl. Skeat considers that poll is from Low Latin padulis, and that the Anglo-Saxon pl was possibly borrowed from the British Latin or Latin remains seen in place-names having port, street, -chester, etc. (Principles @+1 437).
poll, pollair
nostril, Irish pollire, poll-srna; from poll.
pollag
the fish pollock or lythe - gadus pollachius, of the cod and whiting genus, Irish pullg; from poll? Hence the English name. The Irish English pollan, Scottish powan, is a different fish - of the salmon genus.
pollairean
the dunlin (Heb.), polidna alpina. Mr Swainson (Folklore of British Birds) translates its Gaelic name as "bird of the mud pits ( poll)", an exact description, he says.
ponach
boy, lad (Dial.), poinneach (W.Ross); cf. Manx ponniar, a boy, a small fish basket? In ARg. boinnean (Wh.), from boinne. Cf. use of proitseach. The word is for bonach.
pnaidh
a pony; from the Scottish pownie, from Old French poulenet (l lost as usual), little colt, now poulain, a colt, from Medieval Latin pullanus, from Latin pullus, foal, English foal, filly.
pnair
bean or beans, Irish pnaire, Middle Irish ponaire; from Norse baun, Old High German pôna, German bohne, English bean, Dutch boon (Stokes' Celt. Dec.).
pong
a point, note, pongail, punctual; See punc.
pr
seed, spore, Irish pr, seed, clan, Welsh par, germ; from Greek @Gspros, seed, English spore.
port
harbour, port, Irish port, harbour, fort, Old Irish port, Welsh, Cornish porth, Breton pors, porz; from Latin portus, English port.
port
a tune, Irish port, Middle Irish ceudport, rhyme, prelude: "carry = catch"; from Latin porto, carry. Scottish port, catch, tune, is from Gaelic. Cf. English sport, from Latin dis-port.
ps
marry, Old Gaelic psta, wedded (Book of Deer), Middle Irish psaim; from Latin sponsus, sponsa, betrothed, from spondeo, I promise (English spouse, respond, etc.).
post
post, beam, pillar, Irish posda, posta, Welsh post; from the English post, from Latin postis. Pl. puist, slugs for shooting (Wh.).
prab
discompose, ravel (prb, H.S.D.), prabach, dishevelled, ragged, blear-eyed, Irish prbach (O'R.): "suddenly arrayed", from prap?
prbar, prbal
a rabble; from prb, prab, discompose. See prab.
prac
vicarage dues, small tithes, which were paid in kind (N.H. and Isles), pracadair, tithe collector; from Scottish procutor, English proctor, procurator.
pracas
hotch-potch; cf. Scottish, English fricasse.
prcais
idle talk; from English fracas?
prdhainn
press of business, flurry (M`A. for Islay), Irish praidhin, Old Irish brothad, a moment; See priobadh.
prainnseag
mince collops, haggis; from prann, pound (M`A.), a side form of pronn, q.v.
prais
brass, pot-metal ( Arms.), pot ( M`A.), pris, brass ( H.S.D., M`L., M`E.), Manx prash, Irish pris, prs, Welsh pres; from Middle English bras, Anglo-Saxon bræs. Hence praiseach, bold woman, concubine, meretrix.
praiseach
broth, pottage, etc., Irish praiseach, pottage, kale, Middle Irish braissech, Welsh bresych, cabbages; from Latin brassica, cabbage.
prmh
a slumber, slight sleep:
prmh , priam
heaviness; properly "blear-eyed-ness"; cf. Irish srm, eye-rheum.
praonan
an earthnut; See braonan.
prap
quick, sudden, Irish prab, Middle Irish prap; See under priobadh.
prasach
a manger, crib, frasach, (M`Rury):
prasgan, brasgan
a group, flock; cf. Irish prosnn, a troop, company (O'R.):
prat
a trick (Wh.); pratail, tricky; See protaig.
preachan
a crow, kite, moor-bittern, Irish preachan, crow, kite, osprey (accordinng to the adj. applied), Middle Irish prechan, crow, raven:
preachan
a mean orator (M`A.), Irish preachoine, crier, Middle Irish prechoineadha, præcones; from the Latin praeco(n), crier, auctioneer.
preas
a bush, brier, Welsh prys, burshwood, covert: *qr@.st-, root qer of crann? The Gaelic, which is borrowed, is doubtless of Pictish origin.
preas
a press, cupboard, Manx, prest; from the English press.
preas
a wrinkle, fold; from the English press.
preathal
confusion of mind, dizziness; See breitheal.
prighig
fry; from the English frying.
prne
a pin; from the Scottish preen, Middle English pre@-on, Anglo-Saxon pron, Norse prjnn, German pfriem.
priobadh
winking, twinkling (of the eye), Irish prap in le prap na sl, in the twinkling of the eyes (Keating), from prap, sudden, preaba in na bi preaba na sula muich (B.of Moyra), Middle Irish prapud, brief space (as twinkling of the eyes), la brafad sla, older friha brathad sula, where we get the series prapud, brafad, brathad (g. brotto), Old Irish brothad, moment. Stokes compares the similar Gothic phrase - in brahva augins, where brahv might = a British *brap, borrowed into Irish. The form frafad could easily develop into brap; the difficulty is the passinng of th of brothad (which gives g. brotto) info f of brafad (but See Rev.Celt.@+10 57). The Gaelic priobadh has its vowel influenced by preabadh, kicking, that is, breab, q.v. Zim. (Zeit.@+32 223) cites brofte, momentary, and says brafad is made from bro, eyebrow, falsely.
priobaid
a trifle, priobair, a worthless fellow; from Scottish bribour, low beggarly fellow, Middle English bribour, rascal, thief; from Old French bribeur, beggar, vagabond, briber, to beg, bribe, morsel of bread, English bribe. Hence priobaid is from an early Northern form of English bribe. See breaban further.
promh
prime, chief, Irish promh, a principal, primh, prime, Old Irish prm, Welsh prif; from Latin primus, first, English prime.
pronnsa
a prince, so Irish, Middle Irish prindsa; from Middle English and French prince (Stokes takes it from French direct).
prosan
prison, Irish prosn, Middle Irish prsn; from Middle English prisoun, from Old French prison (Stokes takes it from Old French prisun).
prs
price, Welsh pris; from Middle English pri@-s, from Old French pri@-s, Latin pretium.
probhaid
profit; from the English
procach
a year-old stag (Rob Donn):
proghan
dregs, lees:
proinn
a dinner, Old Gaelic proinn (Book of Deer), Irish proinn, Old Irish proind, praind; from Latin prandium.
pris
pride, haughtiness; from Scottish prossie, prowsie, nice and particular, Dut. prootsch, preutsch, proud, English proud. The Arran Dial. has prtail for priseil.
proitseach
a boy, stripling; cf. brod balaich, brodan, boy, from brod. The termination is -seach, really a fem. one. In Arg. propanach, a boy, from prop, also geamht.
pronasg
brimstone; formed on Scottish brunstane, Norse brenisteinn, English brimstone. Dial. of Badenoch has the form pronnasdail.
pronn
foon; See proinn.
pronn
bran, Manx pronn; See pronn. Hence Scottish pron.
pronn
pound, bray, mash, Manx pronney, pouding; see, for root and form, ++bronn, distribute, from the root bhrud, break, which thus in Gaelic means (1) distribute, (2) break or crush. Hence pronnag, a crumb, Scottish pronacks.
pronndal
muttering, murmering (Dial. brundlais):
prop
a prop, Irish propa; from English prop.


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