MacBain's Dictionary - Section 37

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stbh
a stove; from the English
stoc
a stock, pillar, stump, Irish stoc; from English stock.
stoc
a trumpet, so Irish, Middle Irish stocc, Early Irish stoc; cf. Scottish stock-horne, stock-and-horn, a pipe formed of a sheep's thigh-bone inserted into the smaller end of a cut horn, with an oated reed, from English stock. Gadelic is borrowed.
stocain
a stocking, Irish stoca; from the English
stoim
a particle, whit, faintest glimpse of anything (Dial.); from Scottish styme.
stoirm
a storm, Irish stoirm; from English, Middle English storm, Norse stormr, German sturm.
stite
prominet; cf. stt for origin.
stl
a stool, settle, Irish stl, Welsh ystôl; from Anglo-Saxon stl, now stool, Norse stll, German stuhl. Hence vb. stl, settle.
stp
a wooden vessel for liquor, a stoup, Irish stpa, a "stoup" or wooden pail; from Scottish stoup, Middle English stope, now stoup, Dutch stoop, a gallon, Norse staup, a stoup.
stop
stop, close up, Irish stopaim; from the English
str
a steep cliff, broken teeth; cf. strr, starr. Norse str.
stras
store, wealth, Irish str, strus; from Middle English sto@-r.
stoth
lop off, cut corn high:
stoth
hot steam, vapour; See toth.
strabaid
a strumpet, Irish strabid; from an early form of English strumpet, that is *stropet, from Old French strupe, concubinage, stupre, from Latin stuprum.
strc
a stroke, ship or boat plank; from Scottish strake, English stroke; from Scottish straik, strait-edge for measuring corn, comes Gaelic strc (do.). Similarly Gaelic strc, mower's whetstone, is from strake; all are from the root of English stroke, strike.
strcair
troublesome fellow, gossip, wanderer; from Norse strkr, a vagabond, etc.
straic
pride, swelling with anger, Irish stric:
straighlich
rattling, great noise, sparkles; root sprag, sparg, crackle, English spark, sparkle, Lithuanian sprageti, crackle.
strille
carpet; from Latin strâgulum, coverlet.
strangair
a lazy, quarrelsome fellow, Irish strangair; cf. dreangan.
streafan
film, carpet (Carm.):
streap
climb, strive against obstacles, Irish dreapaim; cf. dreimire.
stredag
a little liquor (Skye):
streud
a row, line (Suth.); from English street.
streup , strapaid
strife, quarrel; from Latin strepitus.
str
strife, contention; from Norse strð, Anglo-Saxon strð, German streit.
strianach
a badger:
stroch
a streak, line, Irish stroc; from English streak.
strochd
yield, Irish strocaim, strocail, (inf.), fall, be humbled, submit:
stroghach
prodigal (Rob.):
stropach
a prostitute, Irish stropach; from Old French strupe, concubinage, from Latin stuprum, dishonour, violation.
strdh
prodigality, Irish str, strgh; seemingly (because of preserved st in all cases) borrowed from, rather than allied to, Middle English strawen, strew, Anglo-Saxon strowian, Gothic straujan, Indo-European strou, stru. Hence Gaelic struidheas, prodigality, squandering.
stric
(stroic, Arms.), tear asunder, a long rag, strip torn off, Irish stroicim, stricim, sroic, a piece: *srakki-, from srac, confused with strdh?
strolamas
mess (Glenmoriston):
stropach
wrinkled (H.S.D.):
struidheas
prodigality; See strdh.
struill
a baton, cudgel, Irish sroghall, whip, rod, Old Irish sraigell; See sroghall.
strumpaid
a strumpet; from the English
struth
ostrich, Irish struth; from Latin struthio, whence, through Old French ostruche (= avis struthio), English ostrich.
strthan
cake made on St. Michael's eve and eaten on his day (Carm.):
stuadh
a wave, gable, pinnacle, scroll, Irish stuadh, gable, pinnacle, scroll, stuaidh-nimhe, rainbow, Middle Irish stuag-nime (do.), stuaid-lim, leap of the waves, Early Irish stag, arch: *s-tuag, from Old Irish tuag, bow, belonging to the same root as tuagh, axe.
stuaic
( M`A., Arms.), stuaichd ( H.S.D.), a little hill, round promontory, Irish stuaic: *s-tuag-c, from stuadh above. M`A. has the meaning "wry-neck" and sullen countenance, extreme boorishness", which is usually represented by stic. Stokes gives the Celtic as *stoukki-, Breton stuchyaff, to feather, Lithuanian stgti, set on high, English steep.
stuaim
modesty, Irish stuaim, device, mien, modesty: *s-tuamm-, *tous-men, root tus, teus of tosd, silence.
stc , stchd
a little hill jutting out from a greater, a horn, Irish stucn,a small conical hill, stucach, horned; from Teutonic - Norse stka, wing of a building; Scottish, English stook, Middle English stouke, a shock of corn (12 sheaves), stooks, small horns, Low German stu@-ke (properly a projection), a bundle, bunch. But cf. stuaic.
stic , stichd
a projecting crag, an angry or threatening aspect; from stc above.
stuidearra
studious, steady, glum, Irish stuideurach, stuideur, a study.
stuig
incite, spur on dogs; from English stick.
stuird
huffiness, pride, Irish stuirteamhlachd (Con.); from Middle English sturte, impetuosity, sturten, impetuous, quarrelsome, Scottish sturt, vexation, anger, a side form of start.
stirt
vertigo, a disease in sheep caused by water in the head, drunkenness; from Scottish sturdy, from Old F. estourdi, dizzy-headed, now êtourdi, giddy-headed; from Latin extorpidire. From French comes English sturdy.
str
dust; from Scottish stour, Middle English stour, tumult.
strr
the rugged point of a rock or hill, sturrach, rugged: *s-trr, from turr = trr, q.v.? Cf. Norse staurr.
stuth
stuff, metal; founded on the English stuff.
stuthaig
dress with starch, starch (vb. and n.); from Scottish stiffing, starch, English stiff. Perthshire has stifinn.
suabag
a sweeping blow (Suth. R.D.):
suacan
a pot (M`F.), earthen furnace (Arms.), a basket hung in the chimney containing wood to dry (Dial.), anything wrought together awkwardly, as clay (M`A.), Irish suachgan (Lh.), an earthen pot; from suath?
suaicean
a bundle of straw or hay twisted together, a deformed person; See sgan.
suaicheantas
ensign, escutcheon, Irish suaitheantas, a streamer, standard, escutcheon, su-aichintus, ensigns, colours (K.Meyer), Old Irish suaichnid, clear, demonstratio, for su-aithne, "easily known", from aithne, knowledge.
suail
small, inconsiderable (M`F.), Irish suaill, Early Irish suail, a trifle:
suaimhneach
genial, secure, Irish suaimhneach, peaceful, gentle, peaceable: *su-menmnach? See meamna.
suain
sleep, Irish suan, Early Irish, Old Irish san, Welsh hun, Breton hun: *supno-s, developing into *sofno-, *sovno, *souno-; Indo-European root svop, svep, sleep; Latin sopor, sleep; Sanskrit svpnas.
suaineadh
twisting, rope-twisting anything, a line for twisting round anything, Early Irish, Old Irish sanem, g. suaneman, funis: *sognemon-, root sug, soug, Breton sug, trace, Welsh syg, chain, trace; Romance soga, rope, Italian soga, rope, leather band, Sp. soga, a linear measure, Port. soga, rush rope, Churw@"lwsch saga. Stokes finally refers sanem to a stem-root *sogno- beside segno- (whence Early Irish sn, a net for catching birds, gin, root segh, hold, English sail), Lithuanian seg, fasten, saga, sledge. This divorces suaineadh from Gaelic suaicean and sgan, q.v. Cf. Welsh hwynyn, hoenyn, a hair from a horse's tail, gin.
suaip
a faint resemblance; from Scottish swaup, swap, cast or lineaments of the countenance, Norse svipr, likeness, look, a swoop or flash.
suaip
exchange, swop; from the Scottish swap, English swop.
suairc
civil, meek, so Irish, Early Irish suarc(c); opposed to duairc: *su-arci-:
suaiteachan
wagging (tails) (Suth.); from suath?
suanach
a hide, skin, fleece, coarse garment, "plough rein" (Suth.); cf. Irish sunach, a kind of plaid:
suarach
insignificant, careless, Irish suarach: *svogro-, root sveg, sug, German schwach, weak, siech, sick, English sick. Cf. English sour, German sauer, *sûra.
suas
up, upwards, Irish suas, Old Irish sas: *s-uas, from uas, as in uasal, and the prefix s-, allied to the final s of Latin abs, ex, Greek @Ge@'/x, @Gprs, etc., and the initial s of Latin sub, super; possibly for *ens, Greek @Gei@'s, from en, and meaning "into", "to" (Rhys' Middle Pray.@+2 156).
suath
rub, mix, knead, Irish suathaim, knead, mix, Middle Irish sathaim (do.), Early Irish suata, polished down, root sout, sut, mix; cf. English seethe, Norse sjða, cook, seethe, Gothic suaths, a burnt offering.
sbailte
supple; from the English
sbh, sbhag
(suibheag or sui'eag, Dial.) a raspberry, subh, fruit generally (Arg.), Irish suibh, a strawberry, sughog, raspberry (Fol.), Old Irish subi, fragae, Welsh syfi, strawberry, Breton sivi; a side form to root su@g as in sgh. Cf. Greek @Gu@`/fear, a kind of mistletoe.
subhach
merry, so Irish, Early Irish subach, Old Irish sube, joy; opposite of dubhach: *so-bv-io-, "well-being", from root bu, be (see bu, etc.).
subhailc
virtue, Irish subhailce (sbhailc, Con.), Old Irish sualig, virtus, sualchi (pl.): *su-alich (Asc., Zim.@+1 54), root al of altram (Dr Cameron).
suchd
sake, account (M`A.):
sud
(Dial. sid), yon, Irish sd, Early Irish st, siut, illud, illic, Welsh hwnt (h-wnt), other, yonder, Breton hont; from the root of so; sud = s-t (Rhys). Also ud.
sdh
a seam between the planks of a ship; from Norse , a suture (only used for the clinching of a ship's boards), from sy/ja, sow, English sew, suture.
sg , sgradh
mirth, Irish sgadh, sgradh, Early Irish sucach:
sg
suck, imbibe; from Scottish souk, sook, English suck, Anglo-Saxon scan. See sgh.
sugan , corra-shugain
the reflection of rays of light from any moving luminous body from the roof or wall of a house:
sgan
a rope of twisted straw, Irish sgn, suagan, straw or hay rope, suag, a rope (O'R.): *souggo-, root soug of suaineadh, q.v. Hence suigean, a cirle of straw ropes in which grain is kept in a barn.
sgh
juice, sap, also (as vb.) drain, suck up, Irish sgh, sghaim, Early Irish sgim: *sûgô, suck, *sûgo-, juice; Latin sûgô, suck; Anglo-Saxon sûcan, English suck, soak. Welsh has sug, juice, sugno, suck. sg, sch, Welsh sug, from Latin sucus (Stokes).
sgh
a wave (A.M`D.), motion of the waves (H.S.D.); root sup, swing, Lithuanian spti, swing, Latin dissipo, scatter?
sicean
a gag for a calf; founded on sg, Scottish sook.
suidh
sit, suidhe, a seat, sitting, Irish suidhim, Early Irish suidim, sudim, Old Irish suidigur, suide, a seat: *sodeiô, *sodio-n, root sed, sod, Welsh seddu, sedd, Breton azeza, sit; Latin sedeo; Greek @Ge@`/zomai, @Ge@`/dos, a seat; English sit, seat; Lithuanian se@?de@?ti; Sanskrit sdati, sa@-/dati, sit, set.
sil
eye, Irish, Old Irish sil: *sûli-s, allied to *sâvali-s, sun, Welsh haul, heul, sun, Cornish heuul, Breton heaul; Latin sôl, sun; Greek @Gc@`lios, (= sa@-vlios), sun; Gothic sauil, sun; Lithuanian sule (do.).
suilbh
cheer, hospitality, geniality: *su-lubi-, root lubh, please, love, Latin libet, English love. It influences the meaning of suilbhir, originally "eloquent".
suilbhir
cheerful, so Irish, Middle Irish suilbir, Old Irish sulbir, eloquence, Early Welsh helabar, now hylafar, eloquence: from su- or so- and labhair, speak: "easy-spoken".
suim
a sum, Irish suim, Welsh sum, Middle English summe; from Latin summa, sum, chief.
suim
attention, respect, Irish suim; a metaphoric use of suim, sum (Dr Cameron).
suipeir
a supper, Irish suipir; from the English
suire
a maid, nymph, Irish sire ( O'Cl.), a siren (suire, O'Br., Lh., etc., mermaids); from Latin siren, with leaning on suirghe, courtship? Teh word is doubtful Gaelic; H.S.D. finds only an Ossian Ballad to quote.
suiridhe
a courting, suiridheach (better suirtheach or suireach, M`A.), a wooer, so Irish, also surighim, I woo, Middle Irish suirge, wooing, suirgech, procus: *su-reg-, root reg, direct, etc.?
sist
a flail, Irish suist(e), Middle Irish sust, suiste, Welsh ffust, Norse thust, sust, flail; from Latin fustis, club.
sith
soot, Irish sithche, Middle Irish suithe, Old Irish suidi, fuligine, Welsh huddugl (cf. hudd, dark), Breton huzel (French suie): *sodio-, root sed, sit, settle; English soot, Anglo-Saxon st, Norse st. Doubtful.
slair
the gannet; from Norse sla, slan, the gannet, whence English solan-goose.
sulchar
cheerful, affable; side-form of suilbhir?
sult
fat, fatness, joy, Irish sult, Early Irish sult: *sultu-, root svel; Anglo-Saxon swellan, English swell; Latin salum, sea; Greek @Gslos, tossing.
sumag
cloth below a pack-saddle; ultimately from Late Latin sauma, pack-saddle, whence French sommier, mattress, English sumpter.
sumaich
give the due number (as of cattle for pasture); from Scottish soum.
sumaid
a billow, Irish sumaid ( O'R. and M`L., smaid); seemingly from English summit. The Gaelic also means "external senses" (H.S.D.).
sumain
summon, a summons; from the English
sumainn
a surge, billow; See sumaid.
sumair
the drone of a bagpipe:
smhail
close-packed, tidy; opposite of dmhail, q.v.
sunais
lovage - a plant, Irish sunais; also siunas:
sunnd , sunnt
good humour, cheerfulness, Irish sonntach, merry ( O'Cl., O'Br.), sonnda, bold, sntaidh, active, Early Irish suntich, ( O'Cl., O'Br.), sonnda, bold, sntaidh, active, Early Irish suntich, spirited: *sondeto-, English sound?
sunnag
an easy-chair of twisted straw:
supail
supple (M`A.); from the English
srd
alacrity, cheerfulness; cf. Welsh chwardd, laughter, Cornish wherzin, ridere; root sver, sing, speak; English swear, Latin susurrus, whisper, etc. Middle Irish sord, bright (*surdo-), is referred by Stokes to the same origin as Latin serenus.
surrag
vent of a kiln; cf. srn.
surram-suain
a sound sleep; surram, snoring noise as of one asleep:
susbaint
substance, Irish substaint; from Latin substantia.
ssdal
a bustling, pother, affected shyness:
suth
anything (Dial.), Irish, Early Irish suth, weather; root su, produce, Early Irish suth, milk; Greek @Gu@`/ei, it rains; as in sgh, q.v. Further allied is root su, beget, Old Irish suth, offspring, English sun.
suthainn
eternal, Irish suthain, Old Irish suthain, suthin; from su, so- and tan, time, q.v.; s-tan-s (Stokes see).

T

ta, tha
is, Irish t, Early Irish t, is, tim, I am, Old Irish tu, t, sum, t, ta, est, especially atta (at the beginning of a sentence), est (= ad-tât, Latin adsto) and it, ita, "in which is": *tâjô, *tâjet, root stâ, stand; Latin stô, stat, stand, French t, having been; Church Slavonic stoja@?, I stand; further English stand, Greek @Gi@`/stcmi (for @Gs-sta@-mi), set, Latin sisto. See seas further.
tabaid
fight, brawl; Breton has tabut of like force; See sabaid. Cf. Scottish debate.
tbar
a tabor, Irish tabr; from the English
tabh
the sea, ocean; from Norse haf, Swed. haf, Danish hav, the open sea, Anglo-Saxon haef. From Norse also comes the Scottish (Shet.) haaf, open sea.
tbh
a spoon-net; from Norse hfr, a pock-net.
tabhach
a sudden eruption, a forcing, a pull, Irish tabhach, sudden eruption, compulsion, tobhachaim, I compel, Early Irish tobach, levying, distraint, from dobongaim: for root See buain.
tbhachd
substantiality, effectiveness, Irish tbhachd, Middle Irish tabhuchta (Meyer):
tabhair
give, so Irish, Early Irish tabraim, Old Irish tabur, do, post-particle form of dobiur, now Gaelic bheir, q.v.: inf. tabhairt, so Irish See thoir.
tabhal
a sling, Irish tabhall, Early Irish taball, Welsh rafl, a cast, taflu, jacere, Cornish toula, Breton taol, a cast, blow: *taballo-, root tab, to fire, sling; cf. English stab.
tbhairn
an inn, tavern, Irish tabhairne; from Latin taberna, English tavern.
tbharnach
noisy (Suth.):
tabhann
barking, Irish tathfan: *to-sven-, root sven, sound ( See seinn).
tbhastal
tedious nonsense:
tac
a lease, tack; from Scottish tack.
tacaid
a tack, tacket, Irish taca; from the English
tacan
a while, short time; from tac.
tacar
(tcar, H.S.D.), provision, plenty, support, Irish tacar, a collection, gleaning, contrivance. Cf. Norse taka, income.
tachair
meet, happen, Manx taghyrt, to happen, an accident, Irish tachair, he arrived at; from to- and car, turn.
tcharan
a ghost, yelling of a ghost, an orphan, Irish tacharn:
tachas
itching, scratching, Irish tochas:
tachd
choke, Irish tachdaim, Old Irish tachtad, angens. Stokes gives the root as tak and refers to it also Welsh tagu (and ystagu), choke, Cornish, Breton taga. Brugmann and Ascoli analyse tachd into to-acht, root angh, Latin ango, choke, Greek @Ga@'ghw, English anger. Root tak as in Latin tacere (Prellwitz).
tachras
winding yarn, Irish tocharais, tochardadh, Middle Irish tochartagh: *to-cert-, root qert, wind, as in ceirtle.
tacsa , tacas
(Dial.), support, substance; cf. taic.
tdh
a ledge, layer; cf. spadh.
tadhal
frequenting, visiting, Irish tadhall, Old Irish tadal, dat. tadll, inf. of taidlim, doaidlibem, visitabimus, adall, diverticulum: *to-ad-ell, form *elnô (Stokes), go, Middle Welsh elwyfi, iero, Cornish yllyf, eam, root ela, Latin ambulare, walk, Greek @Ge@'lanw, drive, proceed; likely also French aller, go.
tadhal
goal, hail; from English hail.
tagair
plead, Irish tagair (imper.), tagraim, Early Irish tacraim, Old Irish tacre, argumentum: *to-ad-gar-, root gar, as in goir, agair.
tagh
choose, Irish toghaim, Old Irish togu, eligo, electio: *to-gusô, root gus, choose, taste; Latin gusto, taste; Greek @Ggew, taste; English choose.
taghairm
noise, echo, a mode of divination by listening to the noise of water cascades, Irish toghairm, summons, petition, Old Irish togairm, invocatio; from to- and gairm.
taghan
the marten:
tagradh
ghost ( Suth. R.D.):
taibhs , taibhse
an apparition, ghost, Irish taibhse, vision, ghost, Middle Irish tadhbais, phantasma, Old Irish taidbse, demonstratio, tadbat, demonstrat, *tad-bat or *to-ad-bat, root bat, show, see, speak, Indo-European bhâ, bhan as in bn, q.v. Greek @Gfntasma, English phantasm, and phantom are closely allied to the Gaelic
taibid
a taunt; See teabaid.
taibse
propriety of speech: "precision", Early Irish tepe, cutting; See teabaid.
taic
support, proximity, Irish taca, prop, surety, fastening, toice, prop, wealth, tacamhuil, firm, aice, support, food, near, Middle Irish aicc, a bond, Early Irish aicce, relationship: *akki-, *pakki-, root pak, bind; Latin paciscor, agree, pax, peace; English fang, Gothic fahan, seize: Zend paç, bind. The root is a triplet -- pak, pag, pagh (Greek @Gpc/gnumi, make fast, Latin pango, English page, etc.). Zimmer refers Early Irish aicce to the root of agus, aig.
taidhe
attention, heed, Irish uidh, Old Irish oid, id, con-i, servat: *audi-, root av, watch, Latin aveo, desire, audeo, dare, Sanskrit av, favour (see ill further). The t of Gaelic is due to the phrase "Thoir taidhe" (= thoir do aidhe) - Take thy heed: a phrase to which the word is practically restricted, and which accounts for the short vowel of the Gaelic and Irish, the sentence accent being on the verb.
taidheam
meaning, import; See oidheam.
taifeid
a bow-string:
taig
attachment, custom; cf. aig, at.
taigeis
haggis; from Scottish haggis, Old French hachis, English hash, from hack.
taighlich
chattels (Heb.); a side form of teaghlach.
tail
substance, wages, taileas, wages, Irish tille, wages, Middle Irish taile, salarium, Welsh tâl, payment, Cornish, Old Breton tal, solvit, root tal, tel, take, hold; Greek @Gtlanton, a talent, English talent, @Gtelos, toll; Latin tollo, lift, English thole, etc.
tailce
strength, Irish talcnta, strong, Early Irish talce, tailce: *t-alkiâ, root alk, strong, Greek @Ga@'lkc/, strength, @Ga@'lxw, defend.
tailceas
contempt; cf. tarcuis.
tileasg
backgammon, chess, Irish tibhleis, backgammon table, back-gammon, Middle Irish taiflis, draught-board, tables, Welsh tawl-fwrdd, draught-board; from Middle English tables, backgammon, from table, Norse tafl, game, chess.
tailebart
halberd; from the English The Irish, Middle Irish is halabard, which Stokes regards as derived from the French hallebard.
taileas
wages; See tail.
tailgneachd
prophecy; for tairgneachd, q.v.
tille
apprentice fee, premium (M`A., who has tilleabh); See tail.
tille , tilleabh
(M`A.), consequence, air tille, on account of; cf. Middle Irish a haithle, after, as a haithle sin, thereafter, Old Gaelic as thle, thereafter (Book of Deer), aithle, remnant.
tillear
a tailor, Irish tailiur, Welsh teiliwr; from the English, Middle English tailor, taylor, from French tailleur.
tailm
a tool, sling, noose, Irish tailmh, a sling, Early Irish tailm (do.), Welsh telm, laqueus, Breton talm, sling: *talksmi (Stokes); Church Slavonic tlu@uka@?, strike.
tailmrich
bustle, noise; for *tairmrith, Early Irish tairmrith, transcursus, from tairm-, cross, trans (see thar), and ruith, run.
tailp
a bundle, bunch ( Sh., O'R.):
timh
death, mortality, Irish timh, Early Irish tm, plague: *tâmo-, death; cf. Sanskrit tmyati, choke, Church Slavonic tomiti, vexare. Cf., however, tmh, rest.
taimhlisg
traduce (Carm.):
tin
cattle, drove, Irish tin, cattle, spoil, Early Irish tin: *to-ag-ni, root ag, drive, Latin ago, etc.
taing
thanks; from the English thank.
tainneamh
thaw (Arran), Manx tennue, Irish tionadh, Old Irish tinaid, evanescit, root ten as in tana. See aiteamh.
taip
a mass, Irish taip; See tap.
tir
contempt, Irish tir, Early Irish tr; for *to-shr; See sr.
tir
get, obtain, come, Irish tair, come thou, Early Irish tair (do.), tair, venies; from tairicim, I arrive at, come, catch, for *to-air-ic, root ic of thig, q.v.
tairbeart
an isthmus, peninsula: *tar-bertâ, from tar (see thar, cross) and ber of beir: "cross-bringing, portage".
tairbhe
profit, so Irish, Old Irish torbe: *to-for-be, where -be comes from *bv-iâ, root bu, be (see bu).
tairbheartach
profitable, so Irish, Early Irish tairbert, yielding, giving up: *to-air-ber-, from the berb beir, bring.
tairbhein
surfeit, bloody flux (Carm.):
tairg
offer, tairgse, an offer, Irish tairgim, tairgsin, Early Irish tairgim, tharscin (dat.): *to-air-ges-, root ges, carry (Latin gero, as in agus? Ascoli compares Old Irish taircim, affero, tairciud, oblatio, tribuere, from to-ad-ro-ic, root ic of thig.
tairgneachd, tailgneachd, tairgire
prophecy, Irish tairrgire, tairgire, prophecy, promise, Old Irish tairngire, promissio: *to-air-ind-gar-iâ, root gar as in goir.
tairiosg
a saw; See tuireasg.


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