MacBain's Dictionary - Section 31

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rinn
did, Irish rinn, Old Irish rigni, fecit; from ro and gni of n, will do, q.v. See also gnomh.
riochd
appearance, form, Irish riochd, Old Irish richt, Welsh rhith: *riktu-, *r@.ktu- (?); for root, See that of dorch.
riodag
kind of sea-gull (Lewis); Norse rytr, sea-gull.
riof
the reef of a sail; from the English
riofa
brimstone (Nunro's Greek):
romhach
fine, costly, handsome, Irish rmheighe, finery, delicateness: *rîmo-, "measured"; root rîm of ireamh?
rionnach, reannach
a mackerel: "streaked, spotted", from reann, star, connstellation. See reannag.
riopail
mangle, tear (H.S.D.); founded on English rip.
riplis
weakness in the back (Suth); Scottish ripples.
rreadh, a rreadh
really, in earnest, Irish rreadh, da rreadh or rribh, revera; from *ro-fhr, very true?
risteal
a surface plough, used in the Hebrides, drawn by one horse and having a sickle-like coulter, Scottish ristle; from the Norse ristill, ploughshare, from rsta, cut.
rithisd, rithis
rs, a rithisd, etc., again, Irish ars, Old Irish arithissi, afrithissi, rursus. Ascoli suggests *frith-isse, from is, vestigium (see dis). Others have derived it from *ar-fithis, Old Irish fithssi, absidas, fithis, a circle, orbit. The a at the beginning is for ar-: *ar-frithissi, that is, air, by, on, q.v. The root may well be sta, stand, reduplicated to *sistio-: thus *frith(sh)issi-, "resistere, backness".
ro
very, Irish r, Old Irish ro-, Welsh rhy-, Breton re, Old Breton ro-, ru-, Gaulish ro- (Ro-smerta, Ro-danos, etc.): *ro-, *pro-, which is both a verbal and an intensive particle; Latin pro; Greek @Gpr, before; English fore, for; Sanskrit pra, before.
rb
coarse hair; founded on English rope.
robair
a robber; from the English The Irish has robail for "rob".
robhas
notification, information about anything lost; cf. robhadh for root, the old form of rabhadh, q.v.
robhd
a runt; English rout?
roc
a rock; from the English roc, a tempest covered rock (Heb.), so M`K., who derives from Norse rok.
roc
a wrinkle, crease, Irish rocn, rug; from the Norse hrukka, wrinkle, fold, English ruck, fold (Thurneysen). See rug.
rc
a hoarse voice; founded on the Norse hrkr, rook, croaker, Gaelic rcas, crow, Norse hrkr, rook. Welsh has rhoch, grunt, groan, Breton roc'ha, which Stokes refers to *rokka, Greek @Grgkw, snore.
rocail
tear, corrugate; in the latter sense, it is from roc, wrinkle, and, probably, the first meaning is of the same origin. See, however, racadh.
rcas
a crow; from Norse hrkr, Middle English rook, Anglo-Saxon hr/oc.
rchd
a cough, retching (Dial.); See rc.
rd
a way, road, Irish rd, Early Irish rd; from Anglo-Saxon rd, Middle English rode, now road.
rd
a quantity of sea-weed cast on the shore; cf. Irish rd, a cast, shot (O'R.), Early Irish rout.
rd
a rood (of land or mason-work); from the English
rodach
sea-weed growth on timber under water; cf. rd, sea weed.
rodaidh
ruddy, darkish, Middle Irish rotaide: *rud-do-, root rud, roud of ruadh, q.v.
rg , rgair
a rogue; from the English
roghainn
a choice, Irish rogha, g. roghan, Early Irish rogain, n.pl., Old Irish rogy: *ro-gu, root gu, gus, of taghadh, q.v. Stokes gives the stem as *rogôn and the root as rog, which (Bez.Beit.@+18) he correlates with Latin rogo, ask. Bez. suggests Lithuanian roguti, to cost.
rib
filth, sqalid beard, filth about the mouth; cf. rpach for root.
ric
a sumptuous but unrefined feast; seemingly founded on the Scottish rouch as applied to a feast - "plentiful but rough and ready".
ric
tear ( H.S.D.; Sh. and Arms. have roic); See rocail.
roid
bog myrtle, Irish rideog (O'R.), Middle Irish raidleog, darnel, raideog, bogmyrtle (St.): *raddi. Cf. ras.
roid
a race before a leap, a bounce or spring: *raddi-, *raz-di-, root ras, as in English race?
roilean
snout of a sow; really the "rolled" up part of the snout, and so possibly from English roll.
roileasg
a confused joy, roille, a fawning or too cordial reception; cf. Irish rthoil, exceeding pleasure, from toil, will. Also Gaelic roithleas.
roimh
before, Irish roimh, Old Irish rem-: *(p)r@.mo- (Stokes), root per, as in ro (= pro); in form, nearest allied to English from, Gothic fruma, Lithuanian pirm, before. In the pronominal compounds, where s begins the pronoun, the m and s develop an intermediate p coincident with the eclipse of the s: rompa = *rom-p-shu, where su = sôs (see -sa).
rin, rineag
(also rinn, rinneag), Irish rine, rinne, a hair, especially a horse hair, Welsh rhawn, coarse long hair, Cornish ruen, Breton reun, a hair, bristle, Sanskrit roman, hair, etc: *râni-; cf. Irish ruain, hair of tail of cow or horse, ruainne, a hair.
roinn
division, share, Irish roinn, Middle Irish roinded, divided: *ranni-, an i stem from rann, q.v.
risead
rosin; from the Scottish roset, English rosin.
roiseag
a small potato (M`D.):
riseal
surge of a wave, the impetus of a boat, an assault, boasting; from the Scottish roust, strong tide or current, Norse röst, a stream or current in the sea. In the sense of "boast", it is from Scottish rouse, roose, Norse rausan, boasting.
risgeul
a romance, rhodomontade; from ro, very, and sgeul, a tale, q.v.
rist
roast, Irish rsdaim, Welsh rhostio; from the English roast, Old French rostir, from Old High German rôst, craticula.
roithlean
a wheel, pulley, Irish roithlen; from roth, q.v.
rol , rola
a roll, volume, Irish rolla; from Middle English rolle, Old French rolle, Latin rotula; now English roll.
rlaist
a romance, exaggeration; cf. Scottish, English rigmarole.
rmach
hairy, rough:
romag
meal and whisky (Sutherland):
rmhan
wild talk, raving, rigmarole (Dial.); from English row? from Roman? Cf. Welsh rhamant, romance, Irish rams, romance.
rn
the seal, Irish rn, Old Irish rn (before 900), Welsh moelron: *râno-; Lettic rohns, seal (W.Meyer, Zeit.@+28 119). Stokes holds rn as an old borrow from Anglo-Saxon hron or hrn, hrn, whale, while the Lithuanian rinis, Lettic rõnis, seal, must be from Teutonic. Zimmer suggests Norse hreinn, reindeer, Anglo-Saxon hrn. Cf. names Rnn, Rnc, Mac Ronchon.
rong
a joining spar, rung, boat-rib, rongas, rungas (Dial.), Irish runga; from Middle English ronge, rung of a ladder, runge, Anglo-Saxon hrung; now English rung; Norse röng, main rafter, pole. The words reang and rang or rangan, "boat-rib", are from the Norse.
rong
the vital spark, life:
rongair
a lounger; cf. rongair.
rongair , rong
a lean person; from rong, rung: "like a ladder". The Scottish has rung in this sense: "an ugly, big-boned animal or person".
ronn
a slaver, a spittle, Early Irish ronna, running of the nose: *runno-; cf. English run.
rp
a rope, Irish rpa; from Middle English rope, roop, Anglo-Saxon rp; now English rope.
rpach
slovenly, squalid, Irish rpach, a young slut: *roub-tho-; cf. English rub.
rram
dealing extensively with a family in provisions, etc.; liberality (M`A.):
ros
seed, ros ln, flax seed (Armstrong's only use for it), Irish ros, flax seed, Middle Irish ros, genealogy, Early Irish ross ln, flax seed (Corm.), ros, genealogy, to which Strachan compares Gothic frasts, for fra-s@?t-s, from pro-sto (Stokes), a child. A usual word for seed is fras, which also means a "shower", but both are ultimately from *verso, flow, whence Greek @Ge@'/rsc, @Ge@`rsc, dew, and @Ga@'rscn, male. Dr. Cameron compared Greek @Gprson, leek (*pr@.so), English furze.
ros
a promontory, Irish ros, promontory (North Ireland), wood (South Ireland; its usual Irish meaning), Early Irish ross, promontory, wood; in the former sense from *pro-sto-s, "standing out before", root sta, stand, Latin sto, English stand, etc.; especially Sanskrit prastha, plateau. In the sense of "wood", ros is generally regarded as the same word as ros, promontory, explained as "promontorium nemorosum", with which is compared Welsh rhos, a moor, waste, coarse highland, Breton ros, a knoll.
rs
rose, Irish rsa, Middle Irish rs, Welsh rhosyn; from the Middle English rose, Anglo-Saxon rse, from Latin ro@usa. The word rs has also the metaphoric meaning of "erysipelas".
rs
knowledge (Carm.):
rosad
mischance, evil spell: *pro-stanto-, "standing before, obstruction", root sta. Cf. faosaid.
rosg
an eye, eyelid, Irish rosg, Old Irish rosc, oculus: *rog-sko-, root reg, rog, see, Irish ril, clear (*regli-); Lithuanian regi, I See (Bez. apud Stokes). See dorch.
rosg
aincitement (to battle), war ode, Irish rosg, Early Irish rosc: *ro-sqo-, root seq, say, as in sgeul, cosg, q.v.
rot
a belch, bursting as of waves (H.S.D., Dial.); from French rot.
rotacal
horse radish; from Scottish rotcoll.
rotach
a rush at starting, a running:
rotach
rough weather, rtach? (Lewis); Norse rta, storm.
rotach
a hand rattle to frighten cattle:
rotach
a circle of flith on one's clothes (M`A. for Islay), rotair, a sloven:
rotadh
cutting, dividing; from Scottish rot, lines drawn on the ground to show the work to be done, to furrow, rut; cf. English rut.
rotal
a ship's wake; cf. English rut, route, Latin ruptâ.
roth
a wheel, Irish, Old Irish roth, Welsh rhod (f.), Breton rod: *roto-, root ret, rot; Latin rota, wheel; German rad; Latin rtas, Lettic rats; Sanskrit rthas, waggon. Same root as ruith, q.v. Hence rotha, a roll (of tobacco), rothaich, roll thou, swathe.
rotha
a screw or vice:
ruadh
red, ruddy, Irish ruadh, Early Irish rad, Welsh rhudd, Cornish rud, Breton ruz: *roudo-; Latin rûfus, rûber; Greek @Ge@'ruqrs; Gothic rauþs. Anglo-Saxon rad, English red (Scottish reid, Reid); Lithuanian raud, red colour.
ruag
pursue, ruaig, flight, Irish ruaig (n.), Early Irish ruaic: *rounko-, rouk, root rou, Latin ruo, rush, fall.
ruaim
a flush of anger on the face, Irish ruaim, ruamnadh, reddening: *roud-s-men, from *roud of ruadh.
ruaimhsheanta
hale and jolly though old (M`A. for Islay):
ruaimill
rumble (M`A.); from the English
ruaimle
a dry pool, muddy water (Sh.), Irish ruaimle. In Gaelic the word means also the same as ruaim above, whence indeed ruaimle as "muddy pool" may also be. Cf. Scottish drumblie.
ruaimneach
strong, active, Middle Irish ruamach, Early Irish ramna (?): *rous-men-; Latin ruo, rush.
ruais
a rhapsody (M`A.):
ruamhair
dig, delve, Irish rmhairim, rghmhar, digging, Early Irish ruamor; root rou, reu, , dig; Latin ruo, dig, râta, minerals; Lithuanian ruti, dig up.
ruapais
rigmarole (M`A.):
ruathar
violent onset, skirmish, spell, so Irish, Early Irish rathar, Welsh rhuthr, impetus, insultus: *routro-, root rou, to rush on; Latin ruo, rush.
rub
rub; from the English
rbail
a tumult, rumbling (M`A.); formed on English rumble.
ruc , rucan
( H.S.D., M`A.), rc, rcan ( M`E., etc.), a rick of hay; from Scottish ruck, English rick, ruck, Norse hraukr, heap.
rucas
jostling kind of fondness:
rchan , rcan
the throat, wheezing; cf. Scottish roulk (= rouk), hoarse, French rauque, hoarse, from Latin raucus.
rchd
a grunt, belch, rumbling noise; from Latin ructo, belch, erûgere, epit out, Lithuanian rgiu, belch. Cf. Scottish ruck, belch.
rud
a thing, Dial. raod (Arg., Arran), rudach (Arran raodach), hospitable, Irish rud (g. roda), raod, Old Irish rt, g. rto: *rentu-s; Sanskrit rtna, property, goods; also root of rath, q.v.
rdan
a knuckle, a tendon: *runto-:
rudha
a promontory, Irish rubha, Early Irish rube: *pro-bio-, "being before"; from root bu of the verb "to be"; See bi.
rudha
a blush, Early Irish ruidiud; from root rud, a short form of roud in ruadh, q.v.
rudhag , rdhag
(Suth.), a crab, partan:
rudhagail
thrift (M`A.):
rdhan
a small stack of corn ( H.S.D., M`E.); See rthan, peat heap, with which and with rcan this form and meaning are made up.
rdhrach
searching, groping, Irish rdhrach, a darkening:
rug
wrinkle, Irish rug; from Norse hrukka, a wrinkle, fold, English ruck, a crease.
rub
caught, Irish rug, Early Irish ruc, rucc, tulit, Old Irish rouic: *ro+ucc-, where ucc = *ud-gos-a, root ges, carry, Latin gero, gestum. See thug.
ruga
rough cloth (M`A.); from English rug, Middle English ruggi, hairy, Swed. ruggig.
rugadh
a greedy grasping of anything; from Scottish rook, deprive of, rookit, cleared out.
rugaid
a long neck (H.S.D.):
rugair
a drunkard ( H.S.D. says Dial., M`A. says N.); from the English For phonetics, cf. rc, drake.
rugha
a blush; See rather rudha, but rucce ( Corm.) shame, reddening (O'Cl.).
ruic
undesirable fondness (M`D.):
ruicean
a pimple: *rud-ki-, from rud, roud, red, as in ruadh.
ruidhil , ruidhle
(Arg.), a dance; See ruithil.
ruidhil
a yarn reel; from Middle English reel, hrol, Anglo-Saxon hrol.
ruidhleadh
rolling; from ruith, roth.
ruidhtear
a glutton, riotous liver; from English rioter.
ruididh
merry, frisky, Irish ruidiseach, from ruidis, a sporting mood. Cf. ruidhtear.
ruig
half castrated ram; from English rig, ridgeling.
ruig
reach, arrive at, Old Irish riccim, riccu; from ro and iccim, for which See thig. Hence gu ruig, as far as, Old Gaelic gonice (Book of Deer), Early Irish corrici.
ruighe
an arm, forearm, Irish righ, Early Irish rig, forearm: *regit-, root reg, stretch, Latin rego, etc. See ruigheachd.
ruighe
the outstretched part or base of a mountain, shealing ground, Early Irish rige, rigid, a reach, reaches; from the root reg, stretch, as in the case of the foregoing words.
ruigheachd , ruighinn
reaching, arriving, Irish righim, I reach, inf. riachdain, rochdain, Early Irish rigim, porrigo: *regô; Latin rego, erigo, porrigo, I stretch; Greek @Go@'rgw, stretch; further is English right, etc. See irich.
ruighean
wool-roll ready to spin; from the same rroot as ruighe.
ruinn
a point; See rinn.
ruinnse
a long stick or stake, an animal's tail, rump:
ruinnse
a rinsing, rinser; from English rinse.
ruis
a rash; formed from the English Cf. Lithuanian russus, root rud.
ruiteach
ruddy, Early Irish rutech: *rud-tiko-, from rud, roud of ruadh. Stokes (Rev.Celt.@+8 366) explained it as *rudidech, but this would give Gaelic ruideach.
ruith
run, Irish riothaim, Old Irish rethim, perf. rith, inf. rith (d. riuth, Welsh rhedu, to run, rhed, race, Breton redek, Gaulish petor-ritum, four wheeler: *retô; Lithuanian, Lettic rit, I roll; Latin rota, wheel, rotula, English roll, Latin rotundus, English round. See roth.
ruithil
a reel, dance, also righil, ruidhil: *retoli-, root ret, run, wheel, as in ruith; Latin rotula, little wheel, rotulare, revolve, English roll. Hence English reel (Skeat). The borrowing may be, however,, the other way, and English reel, dance, be the same as reel, a spindle or bobbin. *roteli?
rm
a room, Irish rm, Middle Irish rm, floor (O'Cl.); from the English
rumach
a marsh:
rumpull
the tail, rump; from the Scottish rumple, English rump.
rn
intention, love, secret, Irish, Old Irish rn, Welsh rhin: *rûnes-; Gothic, Old High German, Norse rnar, English runes; Greek @Ge@'reunw, seek out; root revo, search.
rsal
search, turn over things, scrape, rsladh, rusleadh, rusling, moving things about (Perth); from English rustle; for ultimate root, See rn.
rsg
a fleece, skin, husk, bark, Irish rusg, Old Irish rsc, cortex, Welsh rhisg, cortex, Cornish rusc, cortex, Breton rusgenn, rusk, bark: *rûsko-; whence French ruche, beehive (of bark), Old French rusche, rusque, Pied. rusca, bark. Stokes thinks the Celtic is probably an old borrwo from the Teutonic - Middle High German rusche, rush, English rush, rushes; but unlikely. The Cornish and Breton vowel u does not tally with Gadelic û; this seems to imply borrowing among the Celts themseles.
rta
a ram, ridglinng; from Norse hrtr, ram.
rtachd
rutting: from the English
rutaidh
surly ( Carm.): rut, ram ( Carm.).
rtan
the hor of a roebuck:
ruth
desire (Carm.):
rthan
(better rghan), a peat heap (= dais); from the Norse hrgi, heap.
rutharach
quarrelsome, fighting (H.S.D. marks it obsolete; Arms.), Irish rtharach (O'R.); from ruathar.

S

-sa, -se, -san
emphatic pronominal particle attached to personal pronouns and to nouns preceded by the possessive pronouns: mi-se, I myself, thu-sa, sibh-se, i-se (she), e-san, iad-san; mo cheann-sa, a cheann-san, his head. So also modern Irish, save that esan is sean: Old Irish -sa, -se (1st pers.), su, -so, pl. -si (2nd pers.), -som, -sem (3rd pers. m. and n., sing., and pl.), -si (3rd pers. f.). All are cases of the pronominal root so-, -se; Greek @Go@`, the (= @G so); Anglo-Saxon se, the (m.), English she. See so, sin.
sabaid
a brawl, fight; See tabaid:
Sbaid
Sabbath, Irish Sabid, Middle Irish sapoit; from Latin sabbatum, whence English sabbath; from Hebrew shabbth.
sabh
sorrel, Irish samh; better samh, q.v.
sabh
ointment, salve; from Scottish saw, English salve.
sbh
a saw, Irish sbh; from the English
sbhail
save, Manx sauail, Irish sabhailim (sbhlaim, O'Br.); from Latin salvare, to save. Kuno Meyer says from English save.
sabhal
a barn, so Irish, Middle Irish saball, Irish Latin zabulum; through Brittonic from Latin stabulum, a stall, English stable. Cf. Middle Irish stferus = zephyr.
sabhd
a lie, fable (H.S.D., Dial.), straying, lounging; cf. saobh.
sabhs
sauce, Irish sabhsa; from the English
sabhsair
a sausage; founded on the English word.
sac
a sack, Irish sac, Early Irish sacc, Welsh sach; from Anglo-Saxon sacc, English sack, Gothic sakkus, Latin saccus.
sac
a load, burden, Irish sacadh, pressing into a sack or bag, Low Latin saccare (do.); from French sac, pillage, the same as English sack, plunder, all borrowed from saccus, a sack or bag.
sachasan
sand-eel:
sad
dust shaken from anything by beating, a smart blow, sadadh, dusting, beating.
sad
aught (M`D.: Cha 'n' eil sad agam, I have naught):
sagart
a priest, Irish sagart, Old Irish sacart, sacardd; from Latin sacerdos, whence English sacerdotal.
saidealta , soidealta
shy, bashful, Irish soidialta, rude, ignorant; from sodal, q.v.
saidh
an upright beam, prow of a ship, a handle or the part of a blade in the handle:
saidh
bitch; See saigh:
saidh , saidhean
the saith fish (Arg.); from Norse seiðr, the gadus virens, now sei.
saidhe
hay; formed from the English hay by the influence of the article (an t-hay becoming a supposed de-eclipsed say).
saidse
sound of a falling body, a crash, noise (Badenoch Dial. doidse, a dint):
saigean
a corpulent little man:
saigh
a bitch, Irish saith ( Con., Lane, etc.), sagh, saighn (O'Br.), Middle Irish sogh, sodh, Early Irish sod, bitch, she-wolf:
saighdear
soldier, archer, Irish sighdiur (do.), Middle Irish saigdeoir, sagittarius, Welsh sawdwr, soldier; from Middle English soudiour, sougeour, Scottish sodger, now soldier, confused in Gadelic with an early borrow from Latin sagittarius, archer.
saighead
an arrow, so Irish, Old Irish saiget, Welsh saeth, Cornish seth, Breton saez; from Latin sagitta. For root See ionnsuidh.
sail
a beam, Irish sail: *spali-, allied to German spalten, split, English spill, split.
sil
a heel, Irish, Old Irish sl, Welsh sawdl, Breton seuzl: *sâtlâ. Ascoli has lately revived the old derivatino from *stâ-tlô-, root sta, stand; but st initial does not in native words become s in Gadelic.
saill
fat or fatness, Irish saill, fat, bacon, pickle: *saldi-; English salt, etc.; Lithuanian salds, sweet. See salann further.
saill
salt thou, Irish, Old Irish saillim, condio, *saldio, salt: *salni-; See salann.
sailm
a decoction, oak-bark decoction to staunch blood, a consumption pectoral; founded on Middle English salfe, now salve?
simhe
luxury, sensuality, Irish simhe, peace, luxury, Early Irish sim, pleasant: *svadmi-; English sweet, Greek @Ge@`ds, etc. But cf. smhach.
saimir
the trefoil clover (A.M`D.), Irish seamar; See seamrag.
sainnseal
a handsel, New Year's gift; from Scottish handsel, Middle English hansell, i.e. hand-sellan, deliver.
saith
the back bone, joint of the neck or backbone, Irish saith, joint of neck or backbone ( Lh., O'Br., etc.):
sl
also sil, sile, sea, Irish sile, Early Irish sl, sile: *svâlos, root sval, svel; Latin salum, sea; English swell (Stokes, who also refers Breton c'hoalen, salt). Shräder equates Gadelic with Greek @Ga@`/ls, salt, the sea, and Latin salum, root sal.
salach
dirty, Irish, so Old Irish salach, Welsh halawg, halog, Cornish halou, stercora, Old Breton haloc, lugubri: *salâko-s (adj.), root sal, to dirty; English sallom, Old High German salo, dusky, dirty. sal, filth, is used.
salann
salt, Irish, Old Irish salann, Welsh halen, Cornish haloin, Breton halenn (*salên): *salanno-s, salt; Latin sal; Greek @Ga@`ls, salt, sea; English salt, German salz; Church Slavonic soli@u.
salldair
a chalder; from Scottish chalder, English chalder, chaldron, from Old French chaldron, a caldron.
salm
a psalm, Irish, Old Irish salm, Welsh and Breton salm; from Latin psalmus, English psalm.


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