MacBain's Dictionary - Section 10

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col
an impediment, Irish colaim; root qela, qlâ, break, split? See call; and cf. Greek @Gkwlw, hinder, which is probably from the same root.
col
sin, Irish, Early Irish col, Welsh cwl, Old Breton col, *kulo-; Latin culpa, colpa, fault. Stokes hesitates between referring it to the root of Latin culpa or to that of Latin scelus, Gothic skal, English shall, German schuld, crime.
colag
a small steak or collop (Arg.); from English collop.
colaiste
a collage, Irish colaisde; from the English
colamoir
the hake ( Sh., O'Br.), Irish colamir; cf. Scottish coalmie, colemie, the coal-fish.
clan
a fellow-soldier, companion; cf. cmhla, together. The Irish cmhlach is for com-lach, the lach of glach.
colann, colainn
a body, so Irish, Old Irish colinn, gen. colno, Welsh celain, carcase, Old Welsh celein, cadaver, *colanni- (Brugmann); root qela, break, the idea being "dead body"? Cf. for meaning Greek @Gnkus, corpse, from nek, kill.
colbh
pillar, Irish colbh, Early Irish colba, Welsh celff, Breton kelf; Latin columna, English column; root qel, high. Gaelic colbh, plant stalk, Irish colmh, is allied to Latin culmus. The Celtic words, if not borrowed from, have been influenced by the Latin
colc
an eider duck (Heb.); from Scottish, English colk, Early Frisian kolke, the black diver.
colg
wrath, Irish, colg; a metaphorical use of calg (i.e. colg), q.v.
colg
sword (ballads). See calg.
collachail
boorish ( H.S.D.; O'R. quoted as authority), Irish collach-amhuil; from Irish collach, boar. See cullach.
collaid
a clamour, Irish collid; See colid.
collaidh
carnal, sensual, so Irish, Early Irish collaide; for colnaide, from colann, body, flesh.
collaidin, codalan
white poppy (H.S.D.; O'R. only quoted), Irish collaidn, codaln; from colladh, codal, sleep.
collainn
a smart stroke; also coilleag.
colman
a dove; See calman.
colpack
a heifer, steer, Irish colpack, Middle Irish calpach; apparently founded on Norse klfr, a calf. Hence Scottish colpindach.
coltach
like; for co-amhuil-t-ach. See amhuil, samhuil.
coltar
a coulter, Irish coltar, Early Irish coltar; from Middle English cultre, Latin culter.
columan
a dove, Irish and Old Irish colum, Welsh colomen, cwlwm, Cornish colom, Breton coulm; from Latin columbus, columba.
cm
the cavity of the chest, Irish com, coim, chest cavity, waist, body. The Gaelic is allied to Welsh cwm, a valley, "a hollow", *kumbo-; Greek @Gku@nfos, Latin cumbere; German haube, hood; root kumbo-, bend. The Old Irish coim, covering, is from the root kemb, wind, as in cam, q.v.
coma
indifferent, so Irish, Early Irish cuma, Old Irish cumme, idem, is cumma, it is all the same; from root me, measure: "equal measure".
comaidh
a messing, eating together, Early Irish commaid, *kom-buti-s, "co-being", from *buti-s, being. See b, be.
comain
obligatino, Irish comaoin, Old Irish commin: *com-moini-; Latin communis. See maoin.
++comairce
protection; See comraich.
comanachadh
celebration of the Lord's Supper; from comann or comunn, society, Latin communio, English communion.
comannd
a command; from the English
++comar
a confluence, Irish comar, cumar, Early Irish commar, Welsh cymmer, Breton kemper, confluent, *kom-bero-; Latin con-fero. Root bher, as in beir.
comas, comus
power, Irish cumas, Early Irish commus, *com-mestu-, *mestu-, from med, as in meas (Zimmer, Brugmann).
combach
a companion; a shortened form of companach.
combaid
company (Dial.):
combaiste, compaiste
a compass, Irish comps; from the English
comh-, com-
prefix denoting "with, com-, con-", Irish comh-, Old Irish com-, *kom-; Latin cum, com-, con-, English com-, con-, etc. It appears as comh-, com- (before m and b), con- (before d, g), etc.
comhach
prize, prey: *com-agos-; root ag, drive?
comhachag
owl, Welsh cuan, Breton kaouen, Old Breton couann; Late Latin cavannus (from the Celtic - Ernault), French chouette, Old French choue. Cf. German schugu, uhu. An onomatopoetic word originally.
co had
a comparison (Sh.); comh-+ fad, q.v.
co haib
contention about rights (M`A.):
comhaich
dispute, assert, contend:
comhailteachd
a convoy, Irish comhailtim, I join; from comhal, a joining, so Irish, Early Irish accomallte, socius, Old Irish accomol, conjunctio, Welsh cyfall, *ad-com-ol. For ol, See under tional, alt.
comhair
presence, e regione, etc., Irish cmhair, Early Irish comair, Welsh cyfer, Old Welsh cwer: com-+ air, the prep. comh- and air, q.v. (Asc.). Cornish kever. Cf. comhghar of Irish
comhairc
an outcry, appeal, forewarning, Irish cmhairce, Early Irish comaircim, I ask: com-+ arc. For arc, See iomchorc.
comhairle
advice, Irish cmhairle, Old Irish airle, air+ le. This le is usually referred to the root las, desire, Sanskrit lash, desire, Latin lascivus, wanton. Ascoli suggests the root la@- of Old Irish laim, mittere, Greek @Ge@'lanw.
comhal
a joining - an Irish word; See comhailteachd.
comhalta
a foster-brother, Irish cmhalta, Early Irish comalta, Welsh cyfaillt, friend, *kom-altjos, root al, rear, Latin alo. See altrum.
comharradh
a mark, Irish cmhartha, Old Irish comarde; from com and Old Irish airde, signum, Welsh arwydd, Middle Breton argoez, *are-video-; root vid, as in Latin video, here pr@oe-video, etc.
comhart
the bark of a dog; from comh- and art, Old Irish artram, latratus, Welsh cyfarth, arthio, to bark, Old Breton arton. Cf. Irish amhastrach, barking.
cmhdach
clothing, covering, Irish cmhdach, veil, covering, defence, Early Irish comtuch, cumtach, covering, "shrine": *con-ud-tog; root teg, tog, as in tigh, q.v. Cf. cintgim, peto: *com-di-segim.
cmhdaich
allege, prove: *com-atach; See atach?
cmhdhail
a meeting, Irish cmhdhil, Early Irish comdl: com-+dil; See dil.
cmhla
together, Irish cmhlmh: com-+ lmh, "co-hand, at hand". See lmh.
cmhla
door, door-leaf, Irish cmhla, Early Irish comla, gen. comlad: *com-la@-, root (p)la@-, fold, groove (cf. Latin sim-plu-s, Old High German zwîfal, two-fold); root pal, pel, as in alt, joint.
comhlann
a combat, Irish cmhlann, Early Irish comlann: *com+lann; See lann.
comhluadar
conversation, colloquy, Irish cmhluadar, company, conversation; from luaidh, speak (*com-luad-tro-). See luaidh.
cmhnadh
help, Irish cngnamh, Old Irish congnam, inf. to congniu, I help: com-+(g)n, "co-doing". See n, do gnomh, deed.
cmhnard
level, Irish cmhrd: com-+ rd, "co-high, equally high".
cmhnuidh
a dwelling, Irish cmhnuidhe, a tarrying, dwelling, Early Irish comnaide, a waiting, delay, (also irnaide): *com-naide; root nes, nas, dwell; Greek @Gnaw, dwell, @Gnomai, go, @Gnates, inhabitant; Sanskrit nas, join any one.
cmhradh
conversation, Irish cmhradh; com-+ rdh; See rdh.
cmhrag
a conflict, Irish cmhrac, Early Irish comrac, battle, Old Irish comracc, meeting, Welsh cyfrang, rencounter, *kom-ranko-; root renk, assemble; Lithuanian rnkti, assemble, surinkmas, assembly.
comhstadh
a borrowing, loan: *com-iasad-; See iasad? Cf. Early Irish costud, consuetudo.
compirt
partnership, Irish cmprtas; from com- and pirt, q.v.
companach
companion, Irish cmpnach, Middle Irish companach; from Early English compainoun, through French, from Late Latin compâniô, "co-bread-man", from pânis, bread. Dialectic combach.
comradh
aid, assistance:
comraich
protection, sanctuary, Irish cmairce, comruighe, Early Irish comairche, Middle Irish comairce; from the root arc, defend, as in teasairg, q.v.
comunn
society, company, Irish cumann; from Latin communio, English communion.
con-
with; See comh-.
cona
cat's tail or moss crops (Sh.); See canach. Cf. gonan, grass roots.
conablach
a carcase, so Irish; for con-ablach; See con- and ablach. "Dog's carcase" (Atkinson).
conachag
a conch (M`A.); from the English
concachair
a sick person who neither gets worse nor better (M`A.), uproar (M`F.):
cona-ghaothach
tempest, raging gale (Hend.):
conair
a path, way (Sh., O'Br.), so Irish, Old Irish conar:
conaire
the herb "loose-strife", Irish conair (O'R.); See conas.
conal
love, fruitage (Carm.):
conalach
brandishing ( Sh.; not H.S.D.); cf. the name Conall, *Cuno-valo-s, roots kuno (see curaidh) and val, as in flath, q.v.
conaltradh
conversation, Irish conaltra ( O'R.; Sh.): *con-alt-radh? For alt, See alt, joint.
conas
a wrangle, so Irish (O'R., Sh.); from con-, the stem of c, dog: "currushness"?
conas, conasg
furze, whins, Irish conasg ( O'R., Sh.): cf. conas above. Manx conney, yellow furze.
condrachd, contrachd
mischance, curse, Early Irish contracht; from Latin contractus, a shrinking, contraction.
confhadh
rage, Irish confadh, Middle Irish confad: con+fadh; for fadh, See onfhadh.
cnlan
an assembly, Irish conln. H.S.D. gives as authorities for the Gaelic word "Lh. et C.S.".
conn
sense, so Irish, Early Irish cond: *cos-no-, root kos, kes, as in Gaelic ch, see; Greek @Gkonnw, understand, @Gksmos, array ("what is seen"), world. See further under ch for kes. Stokes equates cond with Gothic handngs, wise; but this is merely the English handy. It has been suggested as an ablaut form to ceann, head. Gothic hugs, sense, has also been compared; *cug-s-no- is possible.
connadh
fuel, so Irish, Old Irish condud, Welsh cynnud, Cornish cunys, *kondutu-; rrot kond, kn@.d; Latin candeo, incendo; Greek @Gkndaros, coal.
connan
lust:
connlach
straw, stubble, so Irish Old Irish connall, stipula: konnallo-; Latin cannula, canna, a reed, canalis, Greek @Gknna, reed. See coinnlein.
connsaich
dispute; See under ionnsaich.
connspair
a disputant: *con-desbair; See deasbair.
connspeach
a wasp, Irish connspeach (Fol.); See speach, wasp.
connspoid
a dispute, Irish conspid; from a Latin *consputatio, for *condisputatio. See deasbud.
connspunn, conspull
cnsmunn, a hero, Irish conspullach, heroic (O'R.):
constabal
the township's bailiff (Heb.); from English constable.
contraigh
neaptide, Old Irish contracht; from Latin contractus, shrinking (Zeuss, Meyer). See condrachd and traogh.
contran
wild angelica, Irish contran (O'R.):
conuiche
a hornet (H.S.D.), cnuich (Arms.), conuibhe, connuibh (M`L., M`A.); used by Stewart in the Bible glosses. Same root as conas.
cop
foam, Middle Irish, Early Irish copp; from Anglo-Saxon, Middle English copp, vertex, top, German kopf, head.
copag
docken, Irish copg, capg; Middle Irish copg. Founded on the English cop, head, head-dress, crest, tuft; Welsh copog, tufted. The same as cop, q.v.
copan
a boss, shield boss, cup; from the Norse koppr, cup, bell-shaped crown of a helmet, English cup.
copar
copper, Irish copar; from the English
cor
state, condition, Irish cor, Old Irish cor, positio, "jactus", *koru-, vb. *koriô, I place. See cuir.
cram
a faction, a set (M`A.); from the English quorum.
corc
a cork, so Irish; from the English
corc
a knife, gully, dirk, Irish corc: *korko-, *qor-qo-, root qor, qer cut; Lithuanian kirwis, axe; Greek @Gkrma, a chip, @Gkerw, cut. Allied to the root sqer of sgar, q.v.
corc
oats, Irish coirce, Middle Irish corca, Welsh ceirch, Breton kerc'h, *korkjo-. Bezzenberger suggests connect with Lettic kurki, small corn. Possibly for kor-ko-, where kor, ker is the root which appears in Latin Ceres, English cereal, Greek @Gkros, satiety, Lithuanian szrti, feed. The meaning makes connection with Greek @Gkrkoros, pimpernel, doubtful.
corcur
crimson, Irish corcur, scarlet, Old Irish corcur, purple, Welsh porphor; from Latin purpura (English purple).
crd
a rope, Irish corda; from English cord, Latin corda.
crd
agree, Irish cord; from obsolete English cord, agree, bring to an agreement, from Latin cord-, the stem of cor, heart, whence English cordial, etc. The Scottish has the part. as cordyt, agreed.
cordaidhe
spasms (Sh.): "twistings", from crd.
crlach
bran, refuse of grain (M`D.; O'R has corlach), crrlach, coarsly ground meal, over-plus. A compound of crr, "what is over"?
crn
a drinking horn, Irish, Early Irish corn, Welsh corn, Breton korn, *korno-; Latin cornu; English horn; Greek kras, horn.
crnuil
retching, violent coughing: *kors-no-? For kors, See carrasan.
coron
a crown, Irish, Early Irish corin, corn, Welsh coron; from Latin corona (English crown).
corp
a body, Irish, Old Irish corp, Welsh corff, Breton korf; from Latin corpus (English corpse, Scottish corp).
corpag
tiptoe (Arms.); seemingly founded on corr of corrag.
corr
a crane, Irish, Early Irish corr, Welsh crychydd, Cornish cherhit, Old Breton corcid, ardea, *korgsâ, korgjo-s; Greek @Gkrhw, be hoarse, @Gkerhnc, a hawk, Old Slavonic kraguj, sparrow-hawk. Cf. Welsh cregyr, heron, "screamer", from cregu, be hoarse; Anglo-Saxon hrgra, German reiher, heron, Greek @Gkrzw, @Gkrke, screech.
crr
excess, overplus, Irish corr; Gaelic corr, odd, Irish cor, corr, odd; also Irish corr, snout, corner, point, Early Irish corr, rostrum, corner. The Early Irish corr, rostrum, has been referred by Zimmer and Thurneysen to corr, crane - the name of "beaked" bird doing duty for "beak". The modern meanings of "excess, odd" (cf. odd of English, which really means "point, end") makes the comparison doubtful. Refer it rather to kors-, stick out, point, head; Greek @Gkrsc, head; stem keras-; Latin crista, English crest; further is Greek @Gkras, horn, Latin cerebrum, Norse hjarsi, crown of the head; and also crn, horn, q.v. Hence corran, headland.
corra-biod
an attitude of readiness to start; from crr, point, and biod = biog, start. corra-beaga (M`A.).
corrach
abrupt, steep, Irish, Middle Irish corrach, unsteady, wavering; "on a point", from corr, point, odd?
corra-chagailt
glow-worm-like figures from raked embers, Irish corrchagailt; from crr, a point, and cagailt.
corradhuil
first effor of an infant to articulate. An onomatopoetic word.
corrag
a forefinger, finger; from crr, point, etc.
corra-ghriodhach
a heron, crane, Irish corr-ghrian, heron; from crr, and (Early Irish) grith, a cry, scream, *gr@.tu-, root gar, of goir, q.v.
corran
a sickle, Irish corrn, carrn, Middle Irish corrn, *korso-, root kors, kers, an extension of Indo-European qero, Greek @Gkerw, etc., as in corc, q.v. Cf. Indo-European qerpo, cut, from the same root, which gives Latin carpo, cull, Greek @Gkarps, fruit (English harvest), Lithuanian kerpu, cut, Sanskrit kr@.pana, sword. Gaelic may be from a korpso-, korso-. The Gaelic has also been referred to the root kur, round, as in cruinn, Irish cor, circuit ( O'Cl.).
corran
headland; See crr.
corran
a spear, barbed arrow (Ossianic Poems); from corr, a point, q.v.
corranach
loud weeping, "coronach", Irish cornach, a funeral cry, dirge: co+rn-ach, "co-weeping"; See rn.
corrghuil
a murmur, chirping (Heb.); See corradhuil.
crrlach
coarsely ground meal, overplus; See crlach.
corruich
anger, rage, Irish corruighe, vb. corruighim, stir, shake; from corrach. The striking resemblance to Middle English couroux, Old French couroux (from Latin corruptus), has been remarked by Dr Cameron (Rel.Celt. II, 625).
crsa
a coast; from the English course. Cf. crsair, a cruiser.
cor-shomain
thraw-crook; from cor or car, q.v., and soman, q.v.
cos
a foot, leg; See cas.
cs
a cave, Irish cuas, topographically Coos, Coose, Middle Irish cuas, a cave, hollow: *cavosto-, from cavo-, hollow; Latin cavus. It is possible to refer it to *coud-to, koudh, hide, Greek @Gkeqw, English hide, hut. The Norse kjs, a deep or hollow place, is not allied, but it appears in Lewis in the place-name Keose.
cosanta
industrious; See cosnadh.
cosd
cost, Irish cosdus (n.), Middle Irish costus, Welsh cost; from Old French cost, English cost.
cosgairt
slaughtering; See casgair.
cosgaradh
valuation of the sheep and cattle which a crofter is entitled to; Norse kost-gorð, state of affairs (Lewis).
cosgus
cost; a by-form of cosd.
coslach
like, coslas, likeness, Irish cosmhuil, like, Old Irish cosmail, cosmailius (n.): con-+ samhail, q.v.
cosmhail
like; See coslach.
cosmal
rubbish, refuse of meat, etc. (M`A.):
cosnadh
earning, winning, Irish cosnamh, defence, Old Irish cosnam, contentio, *co-sen-, root sen, Sanskrit san, win, sangias, more profitable, Greek @Ge@'\nara, booty. Middle Irish aisne, gain, *ad-senia, Sanskrit sanati, Greek @Ga@'/numi.
costag
costmary; from the English
cot
a cottage; from English cot.
cta
a coat; Irish cta; from the English
cota-bn
a groat:
cotan
cotton, Irish cotn; from the English
cothachadh
earning support, Irish cothughadh, Middle Irish cothugud, support; from teg, tog, as in tigh?
cothaich
contend, strive; from cath, battle?
cothan
pulp, froth; See omhan.
cothar
a coffer, Irish cfra; from the English
cothlamadh
things of a different nature mixed together:
cothrom
fairplay, justice, Irish cmhthrom, equilibrium, Early Irish comthrom, par: com-+ trom, q.v.
crbhach
devout, Irish crbhach, Old Irish cribdech, crabud, fides, Welsh crefydd, *krab, religion; Sanskrit vi-çrambh, trust.
cracas
conversation; from Scottish, English crack.
crdh
torment, Irish crdh, Early Irish crd, cridim (vb.). Ascoli has compared Old Irish tacrth, exacerbatione, which he refers to a stem acrad-, derived from Latin acritas. This will not suit the of crdh. Possibly it has arisen from the root ker, cut, hurt (ker, krâ).
cr-dhearg
blood-red, Early Irish cr-derg; See cr.
crag, crac
a fissure; from the English crack.
craicionn
skin, Irish croiceann, Old Irish crocenn, tergus, Cornish crohen, Breton kroc'hen, *krokkenno-, Welsh croen, *krokno- (?) From *krok-kenn: krok is allied to German ru@cken, back, English ridge, Norse hryggr; and kenn is allied to English skin. For it, See boicionn.
craidhneach
a skeleton, a gaunt figure, craidhneag, a dried peat; for root, See creathach, cron (*krat-ni-).
crigean
a frog, from crg, crg, q.v. : "the well-pawed one".
craimhinn
cancer, Irish cnamhuinn; from cnmh, q.v.
crin
a sow, Irish crin, Middle Irish crnai (gen. case): *cra@-cnix, "grunter", root qreq, as in Latin cro@-cio, croak, Lithuanian krõkti, grunt.
criteag
a niggard woman; likely from crdh.
crlad
torment; from crdh-lot, crdh and lot, q.v.
cramaist
a crease by folding (Skye):
cramb
a cramp-iron, Irish crampa; from the English
crambadh, crampadh
a quarrel:
crlaidh
crawl, crawling; from the English
crann
tree, a plough, Irish crann, a tree, lot, Old Irish crann, Welsh and Breton prenn: *qrenn-; cf. Greek @Gkrnon, cornel, Latin cornus, Lithuanian kras, tree stump, Old Prussian kirno, shrub (Bezzenberger). Windisch correlated Latin quernus, oaken, but this form, satisfactory as it is in view of the Welsh, rather stands for quercnus, from quercus, oak.
crannadh
withering, shrivelling, Irish crannda, decrepit; from crann: "running to wood".
crannag
a pulpit, a wooden frame to hold the fir candles, Irish cranng, a hamper or basket, Middle Irish crannoc, a wooden vessel, a wooden structure, especially the "crannogs" in Irish lakes. From crann; the word means many kinds of wooden structures in Gadelic lands.
crannchur
lot, casting lots, Irish crannchar, Old Irish crannchur; from crann and cuiir.
crannlach
the teal, red-breasted merganser; from crann and lach, duck, q.v.
craobh
tree, so Irish, Early Irish creb, creb, *croib? "the splittable", root krei, kri, separate; as tree of English and its numerous congeners in other languages is from the root der, split; and som other tree words are from roots meaning violence of rending or splitting (kldos, twig, e.g.). For root kri, See criathar.
craoiseach
a spear, Early Irish crisech; from craobh?
craoit
a croft; See croit.
craos
a wide, open mouth, gluttony, so Irish, Early Irish cres, cres, Old Irish crois, gula, gluttony. Zimmer cfs. Welsh croesan, buffoon. Possibly a Celtic krapesty-, allied to Latin cra@-pula, or to Greek @Gkraiplc, headache from intoxication.
crasgach
cross-ways, crasg, an across place; for crosg, from cros of crois, a cross, q.v.
crasgach
corpulent (Sh.; H.S.D. for C.S.); from obsolete cras, body (O'Cl.), Irish cras, for *crapso-, *kr@.ps, root kr@.p of Latin corpus?
cratach
back of person, side (Skye): crot?
crath
shake, Irish crathadh, Old Irish crothim, *kr@.to-; perhaps allied to Lithuanian kresti, kraty/i, shake. But it may be allied to crith, q.v. It has been compared to Greek @Gkradw, brandish, which may be for @Gskardw, root sker in @Gskarw, spring, German scherz, joke. This would suit Gaelic crith, Welsh cryd and ysgryd.
cr
clay, Irish, Old Irish cr, g. criad, Welsh pridd, Cornish, Breton pry. Its relation to Latin crêta, which Wharton explains as from crêtus, "sifted", from cerno, is doubtful. If cerno be for *crino, Greek @Gkrnw, we should have the root kri, krei, separate, as in criathar, and it is not labialised in any language (not qrei). The Celtic phonetics are not easily explained, however. Stokes gives the stem as qreid-, but the modern Gaelic has the peculiar sound which we find in gn, c. This points to a stem qre@--jâ, root qrê, which is in agreement with Latin crêta without doing the violence of supposing crino to give cerno, and this again crêtus. Cf. Old Irish cl, left.
cr, creubh
body; See creubh.
crabag
a ball for playing, fir cone:
creach
plunder, so Irish, Early Irish crech, plundering, hosting; cf. Breton kregi, seize, bite, catch (as fire). From the root ker, cut, ultimately. See corc, knife, and creuchd.
creachag
a cockle, Irish creach, scollop shell ( O'R.); cf. Welsh cragen, a shell, Cornish crogen, Breton krog.
creachan, creachann
bare summit of a hill wanting foliage, a mountain: "bared", from creach?
creachan
pudding mad with a calf's entrails (M`L.):


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